Posts Tagged ‘ Parole ’

Killer Michael Keith Moon Released

 

 

 

Michael Keith Moon, “is a cold calculated killer,” says  Det. Chuck Gaynor.

Moon, 63, has been released from Donovan Prison and has been living in a half way house in downtown San Diego, reports CBS 8 News.

“It is appropriate for the public to be aware of the fact there are people like Michael Moon out there, and these people pose a risk to society,” said Gaylor.

Moon was raised in San Diego and his story is far from being an upstanding citizen.  He was convicted of killing Rhonda Salazar in Reno in 1978.  He plead guilty and was sentenced to life in prison with parole and was released in 1990.  
Moon barely managed to stay out of trouble for a year, before he attacked an elderly man in Woodstock, Illinois in 1991.  Moon probably would have killed him, if a passing citizen had not stopped him.  Moon was charged with attempted murder and was released in 2000.  Moon’s parole was revoked and was sent back to prison until 2005.

In 2007, Moon was arrested for the the 1977 murder of Liborio Lindin, a migrant worker who he beat to death in a garage at a home under construction on Falconer Drive in Escondido. 

Lindin’s murder case remained unsolved for 30 years until Gaylor, who was hired as a reserve officer in 2007 to be part of a cold-case homicide team reopened the case, which tied Moon to Lindin’s murder, reports the San Diego Union Tribune

One partial bloody fingerprint processed by the Dept. of Justice came back as a match to Moon, according to the North County Times.  The team began their long tedious investigation by gathering information and interviewing people that should have brought justice to Lindin’s family with the arrest and conviction of Moon, but it seems to fall short.  

You would think that after the latest conviction that Moon would never be allowed out of prison, but instead he was sentenced to 8 years and after serving four, he was let out of jail again.  It is hard to understand why, after killing two people, and according to Gaylor, probably more that he got away with, that Moon is allowed any freedom at all.  

Even more sobering is that the justice system valued Rhonda Salazar’s life so little that Moon only served 12 years for her murder, but it is even more upsetting that Liborio Lindin’s life was only valued a little over four.

Continue reading on Examiner.com

Unbelievable.

There is another article about this insanity here.

There is a video report here but it comes with this:

WARNING: Some of the video and photos in this video report may be extremely disturbing.

Well, maybe after he kills his next victim the state will keep him locked up.

Concerns Over Serial Killer Parole Hearings

Parole Concerns

Eyewitness News has learnt that police are extremely concerned about a series of parole hearings due to take place before the end of the year involving some of the country’s most notorious serial killers.

Correspondence between the police and the Department of Correctional Services shows that at least one parole report has been compiled without any mention of the fact that the applicant is a serial offender.

The police’s concern is that hearings could be held without the parole boards being given all the background facts.

However, the department said these kinds of cases are treated with extreme caution and few parole applications are actually granted.

A court ruling earlier in 2011 allowed certain prisoners serving life sentences to apply for parole earlier than expected.

Eyewitness News understands the police’s investigative psychology section has identified a group of around 10 serial killers including Stewart Wilken, Bongani Mfeka and Norman Hobkirk.

The section’s fear is that files detailing their crimes can get lost in the prisons system and that if a prisoner is transferred not all of his files travel with him.

This means parole boards risk making decision without having all the information.

However, the department is adamant the parole hearings are thorough and inmates who pose a danger to society will not be set free under any circumstances.

Retired sleuth Piet Byleveld has said these types of criminals cannot be rehabilitated and should remain behind bars.

 

This is not unheard of. Parole Boards do not always get to hear the full impact of the crimes that were commited. That is why so many victim’s families make sure to appear at all parole hearing, same thing with district attorneys.

Paperwork not only gets lost but sometimes they get scanned over instead of actually being read. I know that is not how it is supposed to work, but let’s be honest. Mistakes get made and in thhe case of releasing a violent criminal that mistake can cost lives.

I can not believe that these guys are on the list of prisoners that could get paroled. Aren’t there any non-violent offenders for the list?

Stewart Wilken

Stewart Wilken appeared in court on February 3, 1997, charged with the murders of his daughter and Henry Bakers. Over the months that followed, more charges were added as the police connected the crimes detailed in his confession with existing murder dockets. The final charge sheet listed 10 counts of murder and five of sodomy.

Both Dr. Micki Pistorius and Prof. Tuviah Zabow testified that serial killers in general and Wilken in particular cannot be rehabilitated. At least once during the trial, while Dr. Pistorius was testifying, Wilken asked to be excused to go to the bathroom. On his way he indicated to Sgt. Norsworthy that he was going to masturbate.

Bongani Mfeka

Samuel Bongani Mfeka was arrested on September 8, 1996, in KwaZulu Natal on a rape charge. While in custody Samuel pointed out six areas where the bodies of women who had been raped and strangled were hidden.
The first murder dates to 1993 following the discovery of a body in Carletonville. Another body was found in the veld in Vrede in November, 1994. The four other bodies have since been found in the Kranskop area. The last body found on September 8, 1996, was in an advanced state of decomposition. According to a police source, four of the bodies were found within easy distance of the suspect’s house in a rural area in KwaZulu Natal.
A police spokesman announced that Mfeka was also being questioned in relation to the 15 bodies attributed to the “Nasrec Strangler”. Although he has not been officially charged with the killings, they have spotted similarities between both killers. Detectives are also searching for another man who may have been an accomplice of the suspect. He too is wanted for questioning in connection with the Nasrec murders.

Norman Hobkirk

(From the court document)

1. All three victims had had their trousers and underpants removed and were left lying half-naked from the waist down.

2. All three victims had multiple injuries, way in excess of that which would be necessary to kill a person.

3. There had been actual physical contact between each victim and the aggressor.

4. All three victims were killed with a sharp instrument.

5. The victims had not apparently been robbed.

6. There were none of the usually apparent motives, such as anger, jealousy, greed and so on.

7. The victims were not in a position to put up much resistance. In the case of the first two the blood alcohol test, conducted as a result of the post-mortem examination, showed that they were under the influence of alcohol to a considerable extent at the time that they were killed. The third deceased was a frail elderly man.

8. The attacks took place in a highly localised area in Bertrams, Johannesburg, within a radius of 200 metres of each other.

9. The victims were all male.

10. In the last two cases the bodies of the victims had been burned after they had been killed. The killings bore the hallmarks of what is colloquially known as “a serial killer”. With regard to charge 1 the evidence of the state may be summarised as follows:

11. There was the testimony of the eyewitness Matilda Stigling, She was about 11 or 1 2 years old at the time that deceased 1 was killed. She had known the accused since she was 4 years old. They had lived in the same street in Bertrams. They were related to each other by marriage. On the late afternoon or early evening of 28 November 1992 she had been walking towards the Maurice Freeman Recreation Centre on her way to the shops. On her way she saw the accused attacking the first deceased with a brick and then grab him and attack him further. She then ran away. She had recognised the first deceased having seen him quite often in the area for some ten days prior to the incident. She told her mother about the incident upon arriving home. What she had seen had not been reported to the police because her mother did not want to get involved. 

These are not robberies gone bad or accidents, these are some very brutal killings. Why are they on a list for possible parole? It is scary that anyone in the same government that decided to put them on the list might have a say as to whether or not they get parole.

 

Winston Mosley Up For Parole & Testing New Laws

Nearly half a century after the Kitty Genovese murder shocked the conscience of New York City and became a national symbol of urban apathy, her killer is coming up for parole for the 15th time. But this year the deal is a bit different for Winston Moseley, her assailant.

For the first time since he became eligible for parole in 1984, Mr. Moseley will appear before a parole board that now is being directed to look beyond his crime and criminal record, and consider if the 76-year-old who committed hideous crimes 47 years ago is the same person seeking freedom.

Nestled into budget legislation this year was a revision of Executive Law §259(c) that requires the parole board to establish and apply “risk and needs principles to measure the rehabilitation of persons appearing before the board” and the likelihood of success should the offender be released. In the past, the board “could” consider those factors; as of today it “must” consider them.

I hope that the same budget cuts that formed this law put aside money for all the criminals that will return to prison once they are pushed out.

Oh, wait. I guess the ones that pushed this figure they will be out of office by that time.   ?

Mr. Moseley will be among the first inmates evaluated under the revised system when he meets the parole board the week of Oct. 31. Advocates who have long promoted parole reform are watching the process closely. 

Halloween week, how fitting.

“We have always had a list of factors the board was supposed to consider, such as the seriousness of the crime, criminal history and participation in [rehabilitative] programs,” said Philip M. Genty, a professor at Columbia Law School and director of its Prisoners and Families Clinic who has written about the new law for the New York Law Journal (“Changes to Parole Laws Signal Potentially Sweeping Policy Shift,” Sept. 2).

The new law requires the parole board to adopt procedures that incorporate a growing body of social science research about assessing post-release needs and recidivism risks, according to Mr. Genty.

“The devil is in the details and it will depend on what regulations actually get written, but the change both rationalizes and modernizes the parole laws in ways that are long overdue,” said Mr. Genty.

The risk assessment tool is under development and is expected to be in use by November, according to Peter K. Cutler, a spokesman for the new Department of Corrections and Community Supervision, which was created this year through the merger of the prison and parole systems.

Mr. Moseley is hardly a sympathetic figure.

Records indicate that in the early morning hours of March 13, 1964, he was cruising the streets of Queens when he confronted Ms. Genovese, the 28-year-old manager of a Jamaica Avenue sports bar, after she got out of her red Fiat and began walking the 100 feet to her Kew Gardens apartment. Ms. Genovese attempted to escape, but Mr. Moseley caught her and stabbed her in the back twice as she screamed for help.

Mr. Moseley fled briefly, but when no one came to Ms. Genovese’s aid he resumed his hunt, following her trail of blood. He found her collapsed in a hallway, where he  raped and robbed her, and then stabbed her another 15 times,  including several times in the throat in an effort to silence her, according to the prosecution.

The New York Times, in an account that is disputed but nevertheless bred a legend, reported at the time that more than three dozen New Yorkers heard and ignored Ms. Genovese’s continual pleas for help as Mr. Moseley chased her down and attacked her again and again.

A month earlier, according to the prosecution, Mr. Moseley broke into a home, shot a 24-year-old woman six times and had sex with her dead body. He later explained that he had an “uncontrollable urge to kill” and claimed to have committed at least five rapes and 35 burglaries before his encounter with Ms. Genovese, according to the Queen’s District Attorney’s Office.

He killed a teenage girl and another woman. He likes killing.

Moseley quickly confessed to the Genovese killing and two others. He told cops he had killed Barbara Kralik, 15, on July 20 in Springfield Gardens, Queens, and shot Annie Mae Johnson, 24, of South Ozone Park, Queens, on February 29. Both were savage killings and may have involved sexual assault. 

Mr. Moseley was sentenced to the death penalty, although the sentence was reduced to 20 years to life.Then, in 1968, while Mr. Moseley was serving time at Attica state prison, he was brought to nearby Buffalo for minor surgery and escaped. He broke into a home in Buffalo, tied up a man and raped his wife. 

A little more detail on his escape might warrant mentioning,

In 1968, a year after the appeals court made his death sentence a life sentence Moseley was on his way to a hospital to get (tax payer funded) surgery. He overpowered a guard and proceeded to beat him to the point where the guard’s eyes were bleeding. He then stole guard’s gun.

He then took 5 people hostage. During his 2 day crime spree he also raped a woman while her husband watched .

He surrendered after a half hour-long standoff with a FBI detective. He had held his gun on the agent who had his gun on Moseley during the standoff.

Moseley was also involved in the Attica Prison Riots.

Here

At his most recent parole interview, in 2009, the board cited Mr. Moseley’s “heinous” offense, “total disregard for the life of another human being” and apparent lack of insight into why he killed Ms. Genovese or committed the rape in Buffalo, although he did stress that he sent letters of apology to The New York Times for the Genovese murder and to the Buffalo News for the rape.

The board noted in passing that Mr. Moseley has a good disciplinary record, and made “positive use” of his time in prison by earning a bachelor’s degree in sociology and working as a teacher’s assistant. But the panel, basing its decision on Mr. Moseley’s violent past, concluded that his release would be “incompatible with the welfare and safety of the community.” 

At one parole hearing Moseley said:

“For a victim outside, it’s a one-time or one-hour or one-minute affair,” Moseley said. “But for the person who’s caught, it’s forever.”

He has also said:

“The crime was tragic, but it did serve society, urging it as it did to come to the aid of its members in distress or danger (sic).”

Yes, he tries to place himself into the role of a victim!

He blames his parents and society for his actions.

Riots, beating guards, escape, assault and rape. Also no remorse, no empathy and a reflection of blame.

Why is he getting a hearing and who the Hell thinks this is a “good disciplinary record”???

JoAnne Page, president and chief executive officer of The Fortune Society, a social services and advocacy group that promotes successful re-entry from prison had this to say.

“People change,” Ms. Page said. “If there is anything I know from my 22 years heading Fortune, it is that people who have been menaces to the community have the capacity to become good neighbors and make a positive difference in the world. And the people who committed the most horrific crimes and served decades [in prison] are beyond the age when people tend to recidivate.”

I say that everyone that is released based on this social reform gets a house in Ms. Page’s neighborhood. She seems to want to welcome them to the outside. Let her have them.

At the age of 76, Mr. Moseley is statistically unlikely to re-offend, but the Queens District Attorney’s Office opposes his release and maintains “there is no question that if Winston Moseley is released he will again commit crimes against society and the citizens of New York.”

In a March letter to Mr. Moseley’s parole officer, Executive Assistant District Attorney Charles A. Testagrossa described the inmate as a “callous, vicious, violent man who is a serial rapist, burglar and multiple murder,” and who has no “compassion or sorrow for his victims and is not capable of living a law-abiding life.”

The letter, written before the change in law, references nothing that occurred since 1971, when Mr. Moseley took part in the Attica prison riot.

Full Article Here

@|John Caher can be contacted at jcaher@alm.com.

 

Even if Mosley doesn’t re-offend he is still supposed to be punished.

Prison is not just about reformation, it is about punishment. This man destroyed people and shows no remorse.

Let him rot, I do not care if he is bed ridden, which he isn’t.

Oh, as for his age, a 76 year old serial killer / rapist in good health is a threat. Let’s not discriminate based on age.

 

More information:

In 1977, Moseley wrote a long letter to The Times airing his thoughts on his killings and life in prison. As for the Catherine Genovese murder, he said, “The crime was tragic, but it did serve society, urging it as it did to come to the aid of its members in distress or danger (sic).” The Times, apparently seeing something profound in Moseley’s words, saw fit to publish the entire article in its Op Ed section under the alluring title Today I’m a Man Who Wants to Be An Asset on April 11, 1977. The story spanned 4 columns, replete with graphics and Moseley’s own description of a “different” and “constructive” multiple killer. “The man who killed Kitty Genovese in Queens in 1964 is no more,” Moseley wrote, “Another vastly different individual has emerged, a Winston Moseley intent and determined to do constructive, not destructive things.”

Moseley realized he would become eligible for parole and he began a concentrated effort to gain release from prison. He read books from the prison library, and using taxpayer funds, was able to enroll in a college program. In the late 1970s, he became one of the first inmates in New York State to earn a college degree when he received a B.A. in Sociology from Niagara University. He wrote letters to newspapers and continued his campaign to obtain a parole.

During the period 1984 through 1995, Moseley appeared before the state parole board six times. His appearances were marked by his bizarre, self-serving comments to the panel, and he frequently assumed the role of society’s victim. “For a victim outside, it’s a one-time or one hour or one minute affair, but for the person who’s caught, it’s forever,” he said in 1984. “People do kill people when they mug them sometimes,” he added. At one parole hearing, Moseley claimed he had written a letter to the Genovese family “to apologize for the inconvenience I caused.” The Genovese family strongly denied receiving any such communication nor did they wish for one.

In 1995, at the age of 60, Moseley thought he had found a way out of prison. He appealed to a federal court to give him a new trial because he claimed that his attorney, Sidney Sparrow, had a conflict of interest during his trial. Sparrow had once represented Catherine Genovese on a minor gambling charge and, therefore, Moseley surmised, he could not represent him when he was accused of her murder. This time, however, the Genovese family did attend. All three brothers, Vince, Frank and Bill, who lost both legs in 1967 during the Vietnam War, and a sister, Susan, were there. “It was tough to hear it all again,” said Bill recently, “but it was tougher on Vince who testified.” Sparrow, then 82 years old, also attended the hearing and later said that Moseley was a liar “trying to get out of prison anyway he can.” On November 13, 1995, a federal judge denied Moseley’s request for a new trial saying that Sparrow in 1964 “gave Moseley effective, competent and capable counsel under difficult circumstances.” He was returned to prison once again.

Kitty Killer: I’m Victim Too Says Notoriety Causes Him Hurt

Referring to the Genovese killing, Moseley said: “There were worse murders, and more serious or ones that are just as serious but this case, for some reason, is unprecedented in the annals, in perhaps the last 25 years, in the way it’s been publicized. “It does cause, of course, hurt for me,” he said.

Later, after telling a commissioner he “never intended to kill Miss Genovese,” Moseley said, “What happened then would be called mugging. . . . People do kill people when they mug them sometimes.”

Serial Killer Robin Murphy Returned to Prison

The former leader of a Satanic cult, who admitted to murder for the death of Karen Marsden on Feb. 8, 1980, was ordered returned to prison after a parole officer determined Murphy violated the parole she won on May 3, 2004.

Murphy was charged with associating with a known criminal on July 19. State Police, working a stake-out as part of an unrelated investigation, stopped the car Murphy was in and found Murphy in the presence of a convicted felon.

As a condition of her parole, Murphy is prohibited from associating with known criminals. She is serving a life sentence with the possibility of parole, so that prohibition will last for the rest of her life.

“She got a provisional revocation of parole by a hearing examiner,” said Caitlin Casey with the Massachusetts Parole Board. “The next step is a hearing with a board member.”

The parole board member will make a recommendation to the full board on Sept. 29. The board will then decide if it will revoke Murphy’s parole.

Murphy was 17 in 1980 when Fall River Police began investigating the murder of Karen Marsden, who died on Feb. 8, 1980.

Paul Carey, now retired, was a detective sergeant then. He tied that murder to two earlier killings, the murders of Doreen Levesque and Barbara Ann Raposa in 1979 and 1980. Both women had a history of working as prostitutes, police said.

The investigation led Carey’s team to Murphy. When they began to question her, Murphy made a deal with the district attorney and got moved to protective custody as a cooperating witness.

Murphy turned state’s evidence and testified for the prosecution, eventually helping convict her former friends, Carl Drew and Andre Maltais, of Marsden’s murder. The murder of Levesque was never officially resolved. Ronald Pina was district attorney at the time.

Murphy pleaded guilty to second-degree murder for Marsden’s death and was given immunity for other crimes in return for her testimony. She recanted her testimony in 1984 in an unsuccessful bid for a new trial.

Carey said he never believed Murphy’s testimony that she had nothing to do with the murder of Levesque and Raposa and was merely a bystander when Marsden was killed.

“She was involved in all three murders,” Carey stated Friday. “Robin is smarter than most, and she can manipulate people, including the DA (district attorney).

“She testified for them and got a free walk on this. I felt badly that she was out on parole. I feel she is a danger to society, still. She shouldn’t be allowed to walk the streets.”

Murphy was granted parole and subsequently was hired by Suzanne Bump, the state auditor.

She was working for the state in Quincy until her arrest, sources report.

Fall River Police began investigating a serial killing in early 1980 after Marsden’s body, which had been decapitated, was found in the woods.

The investigation lead detectives to Murphy, who told them of a Satanic cult, with the murders part of ritualistic sacrifice by the group.

Murphy testified against Drew, who still maintains his innocence in all of the murders. He is serving a life sentence. Maltais was convicted of two of the murders. He died in prison.

Wendy Alves, the sister of Karen Marsden, said she was notified by District Attorney Sam Sutter’s office when Murphy was arrested and ordered back into prison.

“I’m just glad, this time, no one else was hurt,” Alves said. “This time, she only hurt herself.”

Alves said she will be following the parole board’s actions. Carey, the detective, said the same.

He also suggested the case still had life.

There is no statute of limitations on murder, Carey noted.

“The Doreen Levesque case was never solved, and Robin recanted her testimony, so she no longer has immunity for that crime,” Carey said.

He said advances in forensic science, especially in the use of DNA, give him hope that the Levesque murder could be solved some day.

“If Doreen was exhumed, and they got DNA from that body, maybe we could go ahead with a new prosecution,” Carey said. “It is definitely something to think about.”

Read more

Short article on the crimes.

A forum thread dealing with the case. Lots of good links and articles.

A video report about Murphy working for the government.

Mortal Remains

Patricia Krenwinkel denied parole again

Kevin Roderick • January 20 2011 10:41 PM

krenwinkel-then.jpgkrenwinkel-2011.jpgKrenwinkel, now 64, is the longest-serving female prisoner in the California prison system — a distinction she gained when fellow Charles Manson follower Susan Atkins died in 2009. Known in the group as “Katie,” Krenwinkel took part in the August 1969Manson Family killings at the Benedict Canyon home of actress Sharon Tate and, the next night, at the Los Feliz home of Leno and Rosemary LaBianca. Krenwinkel is reportedly the participant who left a fork in the abdomen of Mr. LaBianca and wrote “DEATH TO PIGS” in blood on the wall, and “HeaLter SkeLTter” on the refrigerator. The killers then hitchhiked home through the Valley to the Spahn Ranch in Chatsworth, while Manson — who had been at the LaBianca home — drove with some followers to Sylmar for milk shakes at Denny’s.

Krenwinkel will be eligible to try for parole again in seven years.

Source

These people seem to think that their lives are more valuable than the lives that they denied, destroyed and brought pain to.

Stay in prison, you can not pay back society for the wide spread panic and pain that you caused.

You can not possibly do enough ‘good’ to somehow erase the lives you destroyed.

Rot in prison.

Clifford R Olson to appear before parole board

Full article here.

“He reminds me of the character in the film – Hannibal Lecter in Silence of the Lambs. Hannibal Lecter is a fictitious character, but Clifford Olson is very real,” said Sharon Rosenfeldt, the mother of 16-year-old Daryn Todd Johnsrude, one of 11 children and teenagers murdered by Olson in British Columbia between November 1980 and July 1981. The victims – eight girls between 12 and 18 years old and three boys between 10 and 16 – were tortured and sexually assaulted before Olson murdered them.

On Tuesday, Rosenfeldt and several other relatives of the 11 youngsters Olson murdered are expected to attend his parole hearing at the Special Handling Unit in Ste. Anne des Plaines, a so-called super-maximum penitentiary, 30 kilometres north of Montreal. He was transferred to the penitentiary in June 1997 after it became apparent Olson, now 70, planned to escape from a penitentiary in Kingston.

It will be Olson’s second attempt at a release. He was denied both day and full parole in July 2006 after a bizarre hearing where he spewed out a series of wild lies and told the parole board members listening to his case that he didn’t care what they thought of him.

The board was also presented with a series of negative psychiatric evaluations, including one prepared in 1997 that described Olson as “the quintessential psychopath, showing the ultimate moral alienation.” Olson refused to participate in other evaluations following that one.

Three relatives read victim-impact statements during the 2006 hearing and audio recordings from others were played for the board. All described how Olson ruined many lives. But Olson showed no sign of remorse and Rosenfeldt said she doesn’t expect to find any this time around.

“It’s probably going to be the same. He is a narcissistic psychopath who takes great joy at being the centre of attention,” said Rosenfeldt, who will read a victim-impact statement on Tuesday. “I don’t have to be at the hearing. But I definitely will be there. The only reason is to give a face to my son. His life was taken from him.”

“I will attend every two years until either he dies or I do,” she said.”

Read more

Video about Clifford Olson’s crimes.

<img src="serial killer,child killer,canada” alt=”Clifford Olson and Victims” />

Olson was in the news not too long ago over the fact that he was still getting federal money meant for seniors to live on. He is prison, all his needs are already paid for.

A bill that was crafted after the government learned that serial killer Clifford Olson is receiving federal seniors’ benefits is on its way to the Senate for final approval after it was unanimously passed in the House of Commons.

The proposed legislation would strip incarcerated seniors of their old-age supplements, affecting about 400 inmates serving terms of two years or more.

Olson has said he would sue the government if the bill passes.

The proposed legislation cleared the Commons on approval of all parties, less than six months after it was introduced by Human Resources Minister Diane Finley, who said that paying benefits to imprisoned seniors was “offensive and outrageous.”

Read more here

Video about the financial situation.

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