Posts Tagged ‘ Derrick Todd Lee ’

Derrick Todd Lee denied request for new trial

 

By Quincy Hodges, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

A Baton Rouge judge has denied convicted killer Derrick Todd Lee’s appeal for a new trial in the killing of former LSU graduate 22-year-old Charlotte Murray Pace. Lee was sentenced to death in 2004.

Lee’s case automatically goes to the Louisiana Supreme Court, and if his claims are rejected, the case would go to the federal post-conviction relief stage. Lee made 28 claims, arguing the state has improper death penalty laws, East Baton Rouge Parish systemically discriminates against people of color, misconduct of trial counsel and he had ineffective defense counsel. All his claims were denied by District Judge Richard Anderson Tuesday afternoon.

Lee, 45, of St. Francisville, was also convicted of second-degree murder in the killing of Geralyn Barr DeSoto, 21, of Addis in 2002.

Lee is also suspected of killing seven women between in 1998 and 2003 in south Louisiana.

Article

I do not understand why he is still being allowed to torment people, the families and communities that these ladies lived in. It is not right that he is allowed to keep inflicting pain and fear.

 

Victims on about.com

Of course that does not include everyone he has hurt.

Wikipedia article

Crime Library article

Louisiana Serial Killer’s Art For Sale

BY KORAN ADDO Westside bureau January 30, 2012

MORE FROM THE ADVOCATE

ARTICLE AND VIDEO

Convicted serial killer Derrick Todd Lee has artwork for sale online with at least one drawing selling a day afterit was posted on the site.

A colored pencil drawing of a panda bear eating bamboo is selling for $75 and another colored pencil drawing of two swans against a sunset backdrop,which is listed as “out of stock,” were both posted on serialkillersink.net, a crime memorabilia website started by Jacksonville, Fla., husband and wife,Eric and Jessika Gein.

The site offers certificates of authenticity for the locks of hair, artwork,Christmascards and other personaleffects provided to the site by convicted killers.

But, without an explanation, Lee’s drawings and a letter he wrote — that was on sale for $30 — were removed Friday from the website’s main page. The drawings, however,were still available on the website’s online store Sunday evening.

Although a disclaimer says the cannibals, mass shooters and serialkillers promoted onthe website don’t profit from the items they submit, records from aninmate services website, called JPay, show that since January 2010 co-founder Jessika Gein has sent installments totaling $700 to at least six convicted murderers nationwide,including a $20 payment to Lee earlier this month.

During a telephone interview last week,Gein denied sending money to inmates. She also said she has never directly corresponded with Lee. Prison authorities, however, said they have records disputing those claims.

Louisiana doesn’t have a law preventing inmates from profiting from their notoriety, but authorities at the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola launched an investigation Wednesday into whether Lee violated prison policy by mailing items he knew were going to be sold,and whether he expected to profit from their sale.

Lee, 43, was sentenced to death in 2004 for the first-degree murder of 22-year-old Baton Rouge resident Charlotte Murray Pace. He is also serving a life sentence for the murder of Geralyn DeSoto, 21,of Addis. Authoritieshave identified him as a suspect in the murders of five other south Louisiana women between 1998 and 2003.

May 31 will mark the 10-year anniversary of Pace’s murder. Her mother, Ann Pace, reacted Friday to Lee’s most recent pursuit.

“It’s like we can never be rid of him. Like he reaches out from some dark place and stabs you in the heart. Who in the name of heaven buys these things,” she asked. “It’s like it sucks the breath out of you and takes you back to such a dark place.”

Jessika Gein,29, who said she used to work in real estate,and her husband, Eric, 42, a graphic designer, launched serialkillersink.net in 2008 after years of corresponding with inmates.

The couple’s shared interest inthe macabre led them into what’s she called “murderabilia”or the murder memorabilia industry, she said. They run their website full-time.

“A lot of serial killers enjoy doing art. It’sa nice outlet for them,” Gein said. “We found out there’s a strong market for this stuff. We have a very broad range of customers: doctors, lawyers, soccer moms; you name it.”

Gein said she and her husband each correspond with about 50 inmates at any given time.

“I genuinely have an interest in these people,” Jessika Gein said. “I have questionsto ask them. If they seem like a person I’d like to get to know, I’ll pick up a pen and write to them.”

Gein said a friend of Lee’s approached her a few months ago, offering to sell the killer’s artwork. She declined to say how much she paid.

Gein said she knew the artwork was authentic because it arrived signed and dated by Lee in an envelope with Angola’s address on it. The envelope also had a death row stamp on the front, she said.

Gein posted the items on her website two weeks ago. The drawing of the swans sold in one day, she said.

Jessika Gein said she and her husband don’t put too much thought into how their business affects crime victims.

“I’m not really thinking about the victims. We don’t go out of our way to advertise our website; it’s for certain people who are looking for the kinds of things we sell,” she said. “We’re not out to hurt feelings,but feelings do get hurt.”

Angola WardenBurlCain said investigators spoke to Lee on Thursday after learning his artwork had been posted online.

Lee admitted mailing his drawings to Gein, but indicated that he didn’t know they were going to be sold, Cain said.

Lee, one of 80 offenders on death row at Angola,spends 23 hours a day in his cell. Death row inmates are given sketch pads, colored-pencils and glue to keep themselves busy. They are allowed — with some restrictions — to mail their drawings and letters to whom they choose, Cain said.

“It looks like the website scammed him; they’re horrible people,” Cain said. “He was being nice because she was flirty. He didn’t have a clue they were going to be sold. This is appalling to us because we have to think of the victims. Victims trump in our business.”

Col. Bobby Achord, head of  investigations at Angola, said Gein sent Lee a Christmas card in December to which the inmate responded, hoping to establish a penpal relationship.

Identifying herself as Jessika Miller, Gein sent Lee another note on Jan. 5 with a picture of a blonde woman and wired $20 to his prison account using JPay.

A portion of Gein’s letter to Lee reads: “I’m sorry to hear about you not being able to send pictures, some people have to ruin it for everyone, I guess… I’m glad you took the time to write me back! I’d like some of your art you speak about. Thanks for letting me know that you can accept JPay. I sent $20 to your account.”

Lee mailed his drawings to Gein shortly after receiving the note, Achord said.

While Lee may have violated state Department of Corrections rules,there is no Louisiana law preventing him from earning money from his drawings.

A deadline also has passed for Lee’s victims’ families to seek compensation through the state’s victims reparations statute.

East Baton Rouge Parish First Assistant District Attorney Prem Burnssaid the statute allows relatives of murdered victims to apply for up to $25,000 from a convicted offender within one year of the conviction being finalized,or once the state Supreme Court denies a defendant’s first application for appeal.

“There really isn’t any law in Louisiana stopping someone like Derrick Todd Lee from doing this,”Burns said. “It’s offensive and I would think one of our legislators would want to address this.”

 

I agree that convicts should not be able to profit from their crimes. I am still against banning all murderablilia, I just do not know how regulations would work or what kind of nets can b put into place to make sure the killers are not making the money.

I also think that the law restricting how long a family has to collect or file for compensation from a criminal has to be changed. 1 year is way way to short. Actually there should never be a deadline. A judge should set the compensation and it should have to be paid off, no time limits.
As far as Lee being taken advantage of, ha! I hope that was not supposed to make me feel bad for him.

Family member sees ‘justice’ differently

I noted the Rev. Jeremy Tobin’s description of the justice system (“Poor, minorities paying price of ‘justice’,” Oct. 2 letter).

I thought I would offer another view – one from a victim’s family member perspective. The convicted serial killer in my own case murdered seven women in Louisiana.

Tobin states that our justice system “is built to round up black men, transfer public funds to private companies to warehouse them, and then kill them.”

This is quite different from my experience whereby serial murderer Derrick Lee was represented at trial by three very competent attorneys, one a Millsaps graduate.

As a result of overwhelming evidence – including seven bodies with his DNA, an eyewitness, and other forensic evidence – he was convicted and sentenced to death by a multiracial jury.

It is not true as Tobin says that offenders who are “well represented at trial do not get the death penalty.” Moreover, Lee is being housed at the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola, a state rather than a private institution.

Though Lee’s conviction has been upheld twice already at the level of the U.S. Supreme Court, Louisiana and Mississippi both allow for what is called post-conviction relief (whenever I use that term, I always pause to appreciate the utter irony of that nomenclature), which is yet another set of appeals allowed in capital cases, even those with overwhelming forensic evidence for guilt.

I will go again to Louisiana District Court on Wednesday as I have for years for yet another hearing whereby the defense attorney Gary Clements – out to “score more wins” as Tobin says the prosecutors do -files endless specious claims on behalf of his serial killer client. The post conviction process allows Clements to hijack the legal system, contrary to a rational application of the law.

To me it appears to be a clear case of defense attorneys failing to care at all about the human or fiscal cost of their actions, failing to value honor or justice for the dead, and – in my experience – contempt for the families of those who died at the hands of killers.

Here I have to agree with Tobin; our justice system is “anything but reasonable.” Were it reasonable in cases where DNA – which is considered absolute proof by the Innocence Project – is available, the obvious would be accepted. There is no logic for post-conviction appeals in such cases.

The post-conviction process should be congruent with scientific fact. Good science is the best certainty for justice for all of us – regardless of ethnicity or sex or income level.

Ann R. Pace

Jackson

Here

Fact sheet on Derrick Todd Lee

Victims

 

Sister of Possible Serial Killer Victim Speaks

The loved ones of the people murdered by serial killers suffer everyday of their lives. The killer’s damage far outreaches just those that he actually kills.

Christine Moore

Christine Moore

 

Michelle Skidmore thinks tragedy is right around the corner or just a phone call away. In fact, the San Antonio woman believes that her immediate family — one-by-one — will meet a tragic end. Her critical thinking or pessimism stems from the murder of her older sister.

The case remains unsolved by the Baton Rouge Police Department. However, there is heavy speculation that Skidmore’s sister, Christine Moore, is a victim of Derrick Todd Lee, a man considered as the south Louisiana serial killer.

Investigators from the Multi-Agency Homicide Task Force probing a string of women murdered in southern Louisiana said Lee is connected to the killings of seven victims by DNA. Yet, his alleged terror has been cast on the unsolved murders of other women in the Baton Rouge area. Moore is one of those cases.

According to authorities, the LSU graduate student vanished around May 23, 2002. She reportedly went jogging. Her car was found abandoned. Skidmore remembers a detective calling her parents’ New Orleans home asking permission to open Moore’s trunk. She said her mother broke into tears. The trunk was empty.

Nearly a month later, Moore’s skeletal remains were found near a church not far from Baton Rouge. Investigators believed she was killed by blunt force trauma. What was left of a vibrant beautiful young woman had been exposed to the elements too long to get a DNA sample.

“Nothing was the same after that,”  her 30-year-old sister said. “I wanted to know what really happened.”

‘I will never know’

Conclusive answers have eluded the family for almost a decade. Speculation and the probability of victimology about Lee is as good as it gets. That’s still not enough for Skidmore.

“I will never know if  that man murdered my sister,” Skidmore said.

However, she’d like to have a conversation with a man who is allegedly linked by DNA to the murders of  41-year-old nurse Gina Wilson Green,  21-year-old LSU grad student Geralyn DeSoto, 21-year-old Charlotte Murray Pace, 44-year-old mother and wife Pamela Kinamore, 23-year-old Dene Colomb, and 26-year-old Carrie Lynn Yoder.

Each was either reportedly strangled, stabbed, beaten, sexually assaulted, killed or some combination of the above.

“If I could ask him did you really kill her,” she said. ” I need to know. But would he tell the truth?”

Lee was convicted for the capitol murder of Pace. He remains in prison on death row awaiting execution by way of lethal injection. The so-called serial killer was also found guilty of killing DeSoto.

Moved to San Antonio

Justice seems only a dream for Moore’s family. Skidmore moved to San Antonio because of Hurricane Katrina. She still lives in the shadow of the tragedy. Her move to the Alamo City did not allow the pain to escape.

“I remember my dad telling me maybe someone was after my sister because of the work she did at LSU,” she said.

Moore was majoring in social work. Then, their father changed his mind. He felt Lee was his daughter’s killer. It put the family in the shadow of the so-called south Louisiana serial killer. They were ready to join other families in a fatal bond no one wanted to share.

“There’s not a day that goes by that I don’t think about that and what happened to her,” she said.

It’s something Moore younger sister said she has to live with everyday of her life. She struggles with the inner guilt of “what if.”

“I didn’t lose just a sister,” she said. “I lost a best friend.”

There are other siblings. In fact, six children remain alive. Their mother died in 2009 of health issues. Skidmore thinks her sister’s unsolved murder ate away at their mom little-by-little.

“She never thought it would happen to one of her own,” Skidmore said.

‘Bad things happen to good people’

The Louisiana native recalls praying for her family’s safety. She calls that a naive wish.

“Sometimes bad things happen to good people,” she said. “We are not immune to any of the sufferings of this world.”

That harsh reality has given her strength. She claims it has helped her cope. But, many questions remain unanswered and closure appears a lofty dream. So, she believes that tragic deaths in her family are not over.

“It prepares me for the worst,” she said.

Christine Moore’s murder is a story this sister rarely tells because she admits there are still issues to overcome.

Source

I hope that she finds ways to overcome these issues soon.

Crime library story on Derrick Todd Lee

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