Archive for the ‘ Rape ’ Category

Sherry Marino Will Finally Know if Gacy Killed Her Son

For more than 30 years, Sherry Marino has faithfully visited her teen son’s grave site in Hillside, finding solace there in his memory. But one feeling has continued to elude her: peace.

Officially, her son, Michael M. Marino, is listed as body No. 14 recovered from the Norwood Park Township home of John Wayne Gacy. Authorities identified his remains during the spring of 1980, using dental records — the principal means of identification before DNA testing.

But his mother has always carried doubts. Why did it take the medical examiner a year and a half to identify her son?

Now, her quest to find the answer to whether it’s her only son buried in that grave — or if he is still missing after three decades — is likely to come to an end. A Cook County judge Thursday ruled that his body could be exhumed by the family and tested for DNA.

“Mrs. Marino has been waiting some 35 years to finally determine whether this is in fact her son,” said attorney Steven Becker. “And now she’ll have a chance to actually find that out and give her some necessary closure.”

Uncertainties remain. Is there enough DNA on the body to allow for testing? If it’s not him, who is it?

Marino’s attorneys say they’re confident the remains will provide enough DNA for testing. The autopsy report indicated the body was partially mummified, making it highly likely testable DNA could be collected and compared to the boy’s mother, they said.

DNA testing on decades-old bodies has been successful. Fifty years after the 1955 murder of Emmett Till in Mississippi, his body was exhumed from suburban Burr Oak Cemetery as part of an FBI reinvestigation. The DNA testing of bone marrow in his thigh confirmed Till’s identity.

Now that the family has authorization, it will begin raising the $9,000 to $10,000 needed to pay for the exhumation and DNA testing, Becker said.

The family hopes to exhume the body in about a month, said attorney Robert Stephenson.

When that happens, it will be the beginning of the end to a long, painful chapter for the Marinos.

Michael Marino, 14, vanished Oct. 24, 1976. He and a friend, Kenneth Parker, were last seen near a hamburger restaurant near Clark Street and Diversey Parkway. Testimony would reveal the serial killer picked up many of his victims near that intersection.

“Michael was a sweet, kind boy,” Sherry Marino, 67, said Thursday in an email. “He was not the best student, but he tried hard and rarely, if ever, got into trouble. He loved sports and music. He was an excellent drummer. … He had big dreams of being a musician when he grew up.

“On the day he disappeared, he made me a sandwich and we were planning to go to a movie at 6 p.m. As soon as he was more than 10 minutes late I knew something was wrong because Michael was always on time.”

When police arrested Gacy on Dec. 21, 1978, authorities called on relatives of missing males to submit dental records. Marino’s mother “promptly submitted two sets of dental records and X-rays,” according to the exhumation petition.

Authorities said the bodies were buried on top of each other in a common grave under Gacy’s home.

Experts who worked on the case say the task of identification was not easy.

There were 29 bodies on Gacy’s property and four pulled from Illinois rivers, all in varying states of decomposition. Some were skeletons. Others were less decomposed but still difficult to identify, in part because there were so many matches to examine from missing children in the area.

Adding to the challenge was that the forensic tools, dental records and X-rays — while cutting edge in the 1970s — are fairly primitive ways to identify someone.

“It might have been state of the art at the time, but it was as much an art as it was science,” said Clyde Snow, a forensic anthropologist who worked as a consultant to the Cook County medical examiner’s office on the Gacy case. “Thank God for DNA. Now we can know with some real certainty.”

Marino’s attorneys said discrepancies nagged at her, including that the body was found in different clothing than she last saw on him.

She hired attorneys and private investigators over the years, but each inquiry ended in a dead end.

It wasn’t until April of this year, when she heard that authorities had discovered another location with possible Gacy victims, that she redoubled her efforts. She hired Becker and Stephenson, who are experienced with Freedom of Information Act laws and obtained her son’s pathology and autopsy reports.

The documentation furthered her doubts. The 1979 report indicated the victim had fractured his collarbone and suggested his molars were coming in. X-rays provided by Marino’s dentist months before the boy’s disappearance show not all his molars had grown in, and he had never broken his collarbone, his mother said.

On Thursday, she gripped her purse tightly as the judge ruled. Her daughter put her arm around her. Becker said she holds out hope her son is still alive.

“I think she’s relieved,” said Stephenson. “It’s almost 35 years to the day that her son disappeared. … And again, a lot of the questions are, if not him, then who? But to her, the main question is, is it him?”

Article

It breaks my heart that she does seem to be hanging onto a hope that her son is alive. It is worrisome that she is going to break apart if it is him.

I just can not see this boy dissapearing so many years ago and never contacting his family. It would just add to her pain if it is not him and she begins a futile search.

I suppose that I might do the same if it was my kid.

I hope that whatever the DNA tests come up with she finds peace.

Winston Mosley Up For Parole & Testing New Laws

Nearly half a century after the Kitty Genovese murder shocked the conscience of New York City and became a national symbol of urban apathy, her killer is coming up for parole for the 15th time. But this year the deal is a bit different for Winston Moseley, her assailant.

For the first time since he became eligible for parole in 1984, Mr. Moseley will appear before a parole board that now is being directed to look beyond his crime and criminal record, and consider if the 76-year-old who committed hideous crimes 47 years ago is the same person seeking freedom.

Nestled into budget legislation this year was a revision of Executive Law §259(c) that requires the parole board to establish and apply “risk and needs principles to measure the rehabilitation of persons appearing before the board” and the likelihood of success should the offender be released. In the past, the board “could” consider those factors; as of today it “must” consider them.

I hope that the same budget cuts that formed this law put aside money for all the criminals that will return to prison once they are pushed out.

Oh, wait. I guess the ones that pushed this figure they will be out of office by that time.   ?

Mr. Moseley will be among the first inmates evaluated under the revised system when he meets the parole board the week of Oct. 31. Advocates who have long promoted parole reform are watching the process closely. 

Halloween week, how fitting.

“We have always had a list of factors the board was supposed to consider, such as the seriousness of the crime, criminal history and participation in [rehabilitative] programs,” said Philip M. Genty, a professor at Columbia Law School and director of its Prisoners and Families Clinic who has written about the new law for the New York Law Journal (“Changes to Parole Laws Signal Potentially Sweeping Policy Shift,” Sept. 2).

The new law requires the parole board to adopt procedures that incorporate a growing body of social science research about assessing post-release needs and recidivism risks, according to Mr. Genty.

“The devil is in the details and it will depend on what regulations actually get written, but the change both rationalizes and modernizes the parole laws in ways that are long overdue,” said Mr. Genty.

The risk assessment tool is under development and is expected to be in use by November, according to Peter K. Cutler, a spokesman for the new Department of Corrections and Community Supervision, which was created this year through the merger of the prison and parole systems.

Mr. Moseley is hardly a sympathetic figure.

Records indicate that in the early morning hours of March 13, 1964, he was cruising the streets of Queens when he confronted Ms. Genovese, the 28-year-old manager of a Jamaica Avenue sports bar, after she got out of her red Fiat and began walking the 100 feet to her Kew Gardens apartment. Ms. Genovese attempted to escape, but Mr. Moseley caught her and stabbed her in the back twice as she screamed for help.

Mr. Moseley fled briefly, but when no one came to Ms. Genovese’s aid he resumed his hunt, following her trail of blood. He found her collapsed in a hallway, where he  raped and robbed her, and then stabbed her another 15 times,  including several times in the throat in an effort to silence her, according to the prosecution.

The New York Times, in an account that is disputed but nevertheless bred a legend, reported at the time that more than three dozen New Yorkers heard and ignored Ms. Genovese’s continual pleas for help as Mr. Moseley chased her down and attacked her again and again.

A month earlier, according to the prosecution, Mr. Moseley broke into a home, shot a 24-year-old woman six times and had sex with her dead body. He later explained that he had an “uncontrollable urge to kill” and claimed to have committed at least five rapes and 35 burglaries before his encounter with Ms. Genovese, according to the Queen’s District Attorney’s Office.

He killed a teenage girl and another woman. He likes killing.

Moseley quickly confessed to the Genovese killing and two others. He told cops he had killed Barbara Kralik, 15, on July 20 in Springfield Gardens, Queens, and shot Annie Mae Johnson, 24, of South Ozone Park, Queens, on February 29. Both were savage killings and may have involved sexual assault. 

Mr. Moseley was sentenced to the death penalty, although the sentence was reduced to 20 years to life.Then, in 1968, while Mr. Moseley was serving time at Attica state prison, he was brought to nearby Buffalo for minor surgery and escaped. He broke into a home in Buffalo, tied up a man and raped his wife. 

A little more detail on his escape might warrant mentioning,

In 1968, a year after the appeals court made his death sentence a life sentence Moseley was on his way to a hospital to get (tax payer funded) surgery. He overpowered a guard and proceeded to beat him to the point where the guard’s eyes were bleeding. He then stole guard’s gun.

He then took 5 people hostage. During his 2 day crime spree he also raped a woman while her husband watched .

He surrendered after a half hour-long standoff with a FBI detective. He had held his gun on the agent who had his gun on Moseley during the standoff.

Moseley was also involved in the Attica Prison Riots.

Here

At his most recent parole interview, in 2009, the board cited Mr. Moseley’s “heinous” offense, “total disregard for the life of another human being” and apparent lack of insight into why he killed Ms. Genovese or committed the rape in Buffalo, although he did stress that he sent letters of apology to The New York Times for the Genovese murder and to the Buffalo News for the rape.

The board noted in passing that Mr. Moseley has a good disciplinary record, and made “positive use” of his time in prison by earning a bachelor’s degree in sociology and working as a teacher’s assistant. But the panel, basing its decision on Mr. Moseley’s violent past, concluded that his release would be “incompatible with the welfare and safety of the community.” 

At one parole hearing Moseley said:

“For a victim outside, it’s a one-time or one-hour or one-minute affair,” Moseley said. “But for the person who’s caught, it’s forever.”

He has also said:

“The crime was tragic, but it did serve society, urging it as it did to come to the aid of its members in distress or danger (sic).”

Yes, he tries to place himself into the role of a victim!

He blames his parents and society for his actions.

Riots, beating guards, escape, assault and rape. Also no remorse, no empathy and a reflection of blame.

Why is he getting a hearing and who the Hell thinks this is a “good disciplinary record”???

JoAnne Page, president and chief executive officer of The Fortune Society, a social services and advocacy group that promotes successful re-entry from prison had this to say.

“People change,” Ms. Page said. “If there is anything I know from my 22 years heading Fortune, it is that people who have been menaces to the community have the capacity to become good neighbors and make a positive difference in the world. And the people who committed the most horrific crimes and served decades [in prison] are beyond the age when people tend to recidivate.”

I say that everyone that is released based on this social reform gets a house in Ms. Page’s neighborhood. She seems to want to welcome them to the outside. Let her have them.

At the age of 76, Mr. Moseley is statistically unlikely to re-offend, but the Queens District Attorney’s Office opposes his release and maintains “there is no question that if Winston Moseley is released he will again commit crimes against society and the citizens of New York.”

In a March letter to Mr. Moseley’s parole officer, Executive Assistant District Attorney Charles A. Testagrossa described the inmate as a “callous, vicious, violent man who is a serial rapist, burglar and multiple murder,” and who has no “compassion or sorrow for his victims and is not capable of living a law-abiding life.”

The letter, written before the change in law, references nothing that occurred since 1971, when Mr. Moseley took part in the Attica prison riot.

Full Article Here

@|John Caher can be contacted at jcaher@alm.com.

 

Even if Mosley doesn’t re-offend he is still supposed to be punished.

Prison is not just about reformation, it is about punishment. This man destroyed people and shows no remorse.

Let him rot, I do not care if he is bed ridden, which he isn’t.

Oh, as for his age, a 76 year old serial killer / rapist in good health is a threat. Let’s not discriminate based on age.

 

More information:

In 1977, Moseley wrote a long letter to The Times airing his thoughts on his killings and life in prison. As for the Catherine Genovese murder, he said, “The crime was tragic, but it did serve society, urging it as it did to come to the aid of its members in distress or danger (sic).” The Times, apparently seeing something profound in Moseley’s words, saw fit to publish the entire article in its Op Ed section under the alluring title Today I’m a Man Who Wants to Be An Asset on April 11, 1977. The story spanned 4 columns, replete with graphics and Moseley’s own description of a “different” and “constructive” multiple killer. “The man who killed Kitty Genovese in Queens in 1964 is no more,” Moseley wrote, “Another vastly different individual has emerged, a Winston Moseley intent and determined to do constructive, not destructive things.”

Moseley realized he would become eligible for parole and he began a concentrated effort to gain release from prison. He read books from the prison library, and using taxpayer funds, was able to enroll in a college program. In the late 1970s, he became one of the first inmates in New York State to earn a college degree when he received a B.A. in Sociology from Niagara University. He wrote letters to newspapers and continued his campaign to obtain a parole.

During the period 1984 through 1995, Moseley appeared before the state parole board six times. His appearances were marked by his bizarre, self-serving comments to the panel, and he frequently assumed the role of society’s victim. “For a victim outside, it’s a one-time or one hour or one minute affair, but for the person who’s caught, it’s forever,” he said in 1984. “People do kill people when they mug them sometimes,” he added. At one parole hearing, Moseley claimed he had written a letter to the Genovese family “to apologize for the inconvenience I caused.” The Genovese family strongly denied receiving any such communication nor did they wish for one.

In 1995, at the age of 60, Moseley thought he had found a way out of prison. He appealed to a federal court to give him a new trial because he claimed that his attorney, Sidney Sparrow, had a conflict of interest during his trial. Sparrow had once represented Catherine Genovese on a minor gambling charge and, therefore, Moseley surmised, he could not represent him when he was accused of her murder. This time, however, the Genovese family did attend. All three brothers, Vince, Frank and Bill, who lost both legs in 1967 during the Vietnam War, and a sister, Susan, were there. “It was tough to hear it all again,” said Bill recently, “but it was tougher on Vince who testified.” Sparrow, then 82 years old, also attended the hearing and later said that Moseley was a liar “trying to get out of prison anyway he can.” On November 13, 1995, a federal judge denied Moseley’s request for a new trial saying that Sparrow in 1964 “gave Moseley effective, competent and capable counsel under difficult circumstances.” He was returned to prison once again.

Kitty Killer: I’m Victim Too Says Notoriety Causes Him Hurt

Referring to the Genovese killing, Moseley said: “There were worse murders, and more serious or ones that are just as serious but this case, for some reason, is unprecedented in the annals, in perhaps the last 25 years, in the way it’s been publicized. “It does cause, of course, hurt for me,” he said.

Later, after telling a commissioner he “never intended to kill Miss Genovese,” Moseley said, “What happened then would be called mugging. . . . People do kill people when they mug them sometimes.”

Serial Killer Andrew Urdiales Going to California

Convicted Southeast Side serial killer Andrew Urdiales, who was twice spared death in Illinois, is on his way to California to face additional murder charges, officials confirmed Tuesday.

Urdiales was no longer in custody as of Thursday due to another agency detaining him, according to the Illinois Department of Corrections’ Web site. He had been housed at the Pontiac Correctional Facility in Pontiac, Ill., about 100 miles southwest of Chicago.

A source with the Orange County, Calif., district attorney’s office confirmed Tuesday morning that Urdiales was on his way there via the U.S. Marshals Service. He is expected to arrive in Orange County sometime Thursday.

Urdiales, 47, twice escaped the death penalty in Illinois but could face death in California. He is suspected in the killings of five women in Orange, Riverside and San Diego counties.

Urdiales was sentenced to death in 2004 in the 1996 death of Cassie Corum, 21, of Hammond. He killed her and dumped her body in the Vermilion River in Pontiac.

He was one of 15 men whose lives were spared in March when Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation that abolished the death penalty in Illinois.

The following day, California officials began the process of having him extradited.

Urdiales was indicted in 2009 in five killings in California. He was stationed as a Marine at Camp Pendleton and Twentynine Palms in the state between 1984 and 1991. One woman who escaped an attack in California testified at his trial in Cook County.

Murder convictions are eligible for death penalty sentences under California law. Orange County officials have said they will seek the death penalty for Urdiales and are confident he will be convicted and sentenced to death.

In Illinois, Urdiales previously had been sentenced to death in 2002 in Cook County for killing Lori Uylaki, 25, of Hammond, and Lynn Huber, 22, of Chicago. Their bodies were discovered in Wolf Lake in 1996.

The earlier sentence was commuted to life in prison by Ryan.

Trail of homicides followed Andrew Urdiales

January 1986: Robbin Brandley, a Saddleback Community College student from Laguna Beach, Calif., was found stabbed to death while Urdiales was stationed at Camp Pendleton, Calif.

July 17, 1988: Julie McGhee, 30, a prostitute, was found shot to death in a remote area of Cathedral City, Calif. Urdiales was stationed at Twentynine Palms, Calif.

Sept. 25, 1988: Mary Ann Wells, 31, a prostitute, was found shot to death in San Diego while Urdiales was stationed at Twentynine Palms.

March 11, 1995: Denise Maney, 32, a prostitute, was found dead in Palm Springs, Calif.

April 14, 1996: Lori Uylaki, 25, of Hammond, was found dead in Wolf Lake near the Chicago/Hammond border. Her bloody clothes were tossed in garbage cans in Hammond alleys.

Aug. 2, 1996: Lynn Huber, 22, of Chicago, was found dead on the Chicago side of Wolf Lake. Her clothing was discarded in the same fashion as Uylaki’s.

July 14, 1996: Cassie Corum, 21, of Hammond, was found shot in the head and stabbed several times at a remote rest area near the Vermillion River near Pontiac, Ill., about 90 miles south of Chicago. Her body was dumped in the river. Urdiales picked her up in an area known for prostitution in Hammond.

Read more

I do hope that he gets the death penalty. This guy is dangerous.

Investigators say Andrew Urdiales was smarter than your average serial killer. Between 1986 and 1996, his killing spree spanned from Illinois to California. In that time, he attacked and tortured nine women, with no witneses and no evidence left behind. Only one woman, Jennifer Asbenson, survived.

It wasn’t until 1996 when police tied the cases to Urdiales, who confessed in great detail to the eight murders and the attack on Asbenson.
More info and slide show here

A short excerpt of his confession here.

I know that even if he gets the death penalty in California he will probably die of old age. At least he will be better isolated, he will be in cell alone, he will not get as many chances to hurt other prisoners, guards, maintenance workers, so on. There is also less chance of escape from death row due to the heightened security.

Life Does Not Mean Life Even For Serial Killers

It was a bright day for justice when legislation allowing consecutive sentences for multiple murderers was given royal assent earlier this year.

The prospect of serial killers being eligible for parole after 10 or 25 years, depending on whether it was second-degree or first-degree murder, has grated on Canadians and caused immense anguish for victims’ families.

Fortunately, the federal Conservatives closed that despicable loophole, ending sentence discounts for multiple murderers. The law permits judges to impose consecutive periods of parole ineligibility on people convicted of more than one murder.

So when Joseph Laboucan, 26, was swiftly convicted of first-degree murder Monday — his second murder conviction in four years — I expected Canadian judicial history to be made in Edmonton Court of Queen’s Bench.

In 2007, Laboucan was sentenced to life with no chance of parole for 25 years for the sadistic rape-murder of 13-year-old Nina Courtepatte, who was lured away from West Edmonton Mall on April 3, 2005.

Two days earlier, Laboucan killed prostitute Ellie May Meyer, 33, after picking her up on 118 Avenue with two friends. He had sex with her in a field, beat her to death and cut off part of her left pinkie finger as a trophy.

Laboucan, I assumed, would be the first serial killer in Canada to be hammered with consecutive sentences. He’s got another 21 years to serve for Courtepatte’s murder before he can apply for parole, so adding another 25-year parole ineligibility period would mean he’d spend 46 years in the clink before being considered for release.

Alas, I was far too optimistic. Even though Laboucan’s most recent murder conviction was handed down Monday, the new legislation doesn’t apply to him.

Why? Because the murders took place before the legislation was passed. And because of another legal technicality: although the law received royal assent in March, it’s still not in effect. The law is to come into force on some future date set by the Governor General. It makes you want to rip your hair out.

Not only must this be demoralizing for the families of Courtepatte and Meyer, it will be a shock to the relatives of all the Alberta women who’ve gone missing (and were presumably murdered) over the years.

Even if a serial killer is caught, he will be eligible for parole after 25 years, no matter how many people he killed.

In Laboucan’s case, he committed two murders for the price of one. Clifford Olson, the poster boy of savagery now dying of cancer, committed 11 murders for the price of one — with the right to apply for parole every two years after he’d spent 25 years in jail.

As former Alberta prosecutor Scott Newark points out, it’s as if all the other victims are of no consequence.

“The way our law was designed so many years ago, nobody … ever really thought through all of that,” he says.

It’s too bad Laboucan couldn’t have been hit with a 46-year sentence, adds Newark. He figures federal justice officials were leery of allowing the new law to apply in previous murders, even if the killers aren’t caught until later. “I refer to it as charter angst,” says Newark.

Laboucan isn’t eligible for parole until he serves 25 years of his latest sentence, says Crown prosecutor Doug Taylor.

“With or without the new parole eligibility requirements, the reality of two life sentences is he will likely be in prison the rest of his life.”

Sorry, but that’s little comfort to those who were hoping for harsher justice for serial killers.

Mindelle Jacobs

Edmonton Sun

Mindelle Jacobs has been a columnist with the Edmonton Sun for more than a decade. She writes on a variety of topics, including crime, immigration, health, social issues and current events of the day. 

 

I agree Ms. Jacobs. Excellent article, I hope that the judges listen!

A little information on Laboucan:

 

Laboucan, who is already serving a life sentence for the murder of 13-year-old Nina Courtepatte, pleaded not guilty to the charge of first-degree murder in the death of the sex trade worker back in April 2005. Still, his lawyers did not present any evidence or challenge any Crown exhibits.

Submitted for consideration was testimony from the preliminary hearing, where an eyewitness said she saw Laboucan chasing and repeatedly swinging something at Meyer’s head.

Multiple people also swore the now 26-year-old showed off a severed pinky finger, which the accused told them was a souvenir from one of his victims. DNA later confirmed the body part belonged to the 33-year-old street worker.

In delivering his decision, the judge said he believed the testimony of one youth who said Laboucan got an adrenaline rush from killing Meyer, and wanted to do it again.

RCMP believe just days after Laboucan killed the Edmonton woman and dumped her body in a field, he led Courtepatte to a golf course just outside the city, and committed the second murder.

The Crown says through Courtepatte’s case, they were able to gather key DNA evidence that tied the accused to Meyer’s death.

Whole article here

 

It is such a scary thought that serial killers can be released.

We know that they do not ‘get better’. We can not ‘cure’ them, the only behavior modification that works is death.

How many bodies will court systems allow to pile up before we stop letting serial killers out?

David Owen Brooks Denied Parole

ANGLETON, Texas — Relatives who were told a Houston serial killer may be days away from release expressed relief as his parole was turned down just hours after they addressed Texas Parole Board members, Local 2 Investigates reported Friday.

“I think we got some action, some positive action, from the meeting,” said James Dreymala, whose 13-year-old son, Stanton, was the last victim to die in the 1973 killing spree.

He and other relatives addressed a Texas Board of Pardons and Parole panel member in Angleton Friday, near the prison where David Owen Brooks is serving a life sentence in the killings of at least 29 boys from the Houston Heights.

“I think he’s a human being, and I left it with the fact that any person with any feelings whatsoever would vote no on his parole,” said Dreymala.

His family said that a parole board member told them that parole was likely days away for Brooks, but that attitude changed after Local 2 Investigates reported on the case Thursday night.

Parole Board member Cornith Davis, who was appointed by the governor, shook the families’ hands and told them he had just met with Brooks behind bars Friday as he prepared to make a decision.

Brooks is serving a life term, along with Elmer Wayne Henley, for rounding up boys for serial killer Dean Corrl to torture and kill at a Pasadena home. The crime spree was discovered in 1973 when Henley shot and killed Corrl at that home.

Dreymala’s sister, who was 9 years old when her brother was murdered, said after the meeting that, “I feel like things have changed.”

“I just feel like he’s aware that there’s a lot of power behind us, and that there’s a lot of people that feel the same as we do that, not just victims’ families, but members of society, that don’t want to see him out of prison,” she said.

Facebook page set up by the family to drum up support proudly announced the parole board’s ruling Friday.

Two of the three members of the parole board panel assigned to the case in Angleton cast votes against the parole Friday after the family’s meeting, which formally turned down Brooks’ parole.

 Davis also told the family that he spoke to a relative of Brooks’, who contacted him after the Local 2 Investigates report, and she also urged that parole be denied.

 Brooks will be eligible for parole again in three years. This now makes at least 18 times that his parole has been denied since his 1975 conviction.

James Dreymala said, “I want to see him stay there until he dies, personally.”

 The parole board did turn down the family’s request to have the time between each parole review extended. Instead of being up for parole every three years, they asked the board to extend that to five years between each review.

The board turned down that request.

 Outside the parole board panel meeting in Angleton, city of Houston crime victim’s advocate Andy Kahan said, “There’s no reason for this family and other families to be put through this procedure every few years when it’s within the board’s discretion to give this family more time to heal and go about their lives. This is what you would call a no-brainer case, not to release a serial killer and there’s no reason to every few years to be up here taking the time and resources.”

He said the parole board only extends the time to the state maximum, five years between each parole review, in a fraction of one percent of the eligible murder cases statewide.

 The relatives of Stanton Dreymala said they will meet face to face with parole board members in the same fashion any time that Brooks or Henley come up for parole in the future.

Video and Links

I just can not understand why these families have to keep going through these hearings. Even his own family does not trust him to be out on the streets.

He claims he never killed anyone, but he brought those boys to Corill to be killed. Even if you believe Brooks what he admits to is no different than if he fed the to pigs alive.

From Time Magazine

In all, I guess there were between 25 and 30 boys killed, and they were buried in three different places. I was present and helped bury many of them but not all of them . . . On the first one at Sam Rayburn [Reservoir] I helped bury him, and then the next one we took to Sam Rayburn. When we got there, Dean and Wayne found that the first one had come to the surface and either a foot or a hand was above the ground. When they buried this one the second time, they put some type of rock sheet on top of him to keep him down.

—David Owen Brooks, in his statement to Texas police.

Read more

He minimizes his role every time he speaks.

He guesses there were 25-30? He seems to have so much compassion for the victims doesn’t he?

I agree with Mr. Dreymala, keep him locked up until he dies.

 

David Brooks was born in Beaumont, Texas in 1955. Like Wayne Henley and Dean Corll, he was the product of a broken home. His parents were divorced in the early 1960s when David was only five years old. He spent part of his time in Houston with his father and the rest of the time with his mother in Beaumont.

Wayne Henley (right), David Brooks (left)

Wayne Henley (left), David Brooks (right)

Despite the divorce of his parents, David had a promising beginning as a student, making excellent grades in elementary school. Then in junior high, his grades plummeted. Around this time, he became associated with Dean Corll, who paid him for his sexual favors. Corll had such a grip on the young man that he dropped out of high school shortly after he started so that he could spend all of his free time with Corll.

A sympathetic (IMO) look at David and Wayne from the Crime Library.

Only 3 years to go until his next chance at freedom.

Peter Tobin Exposed in Book by Ex Wife

Cathy Wilson has written a book abut her life with serial killer Peter Tobin called Escape From Evil.

She was 16 when they met and 17 when they married. An excerpt has been released by The Sun and it looks like a horror movie come true.

I DON’T know if it was when Peter killed Daniel’s guinea pigs for nibbling the wallpaper that finally did it.

Or if it was the next time he body-checked me into the wall, or the time after that when he hit me across the dining room, then fell to his knees and begged forgiveness

All I know is that at some point I finally woke up.

I was depressed, I was bruised from his fists, I was lonely and, worst of all, I was scared to be in the same room as my own husband.

Following him into the bathroom, I said: “Peter, I’m not happy. I want a divorce.”

He smiled and nodded. Then his face changed. Without a word, he barged past me and ran across the landing to Daniel’s room.

He reappeared carrying our son. Holding a confused Daniel at arms’ length over the staircase, he said: “I’m only going to say this once. If you leave me, I will f***ing hunt you down and kill you. And then I’ll kill the kid.”

Screaming hysterically I said: “Okay, you win. I’ll stay. I promise.” He considered it for a second, nodded and swung Daniel over to me. Then he skipped downstairs as calmly as if he were being called for breakfast.

Everything got worse after that. I was under 24-hour surveillance. He confiscated my car and purse, so I couldn’t go out or do anything.

If he went out he locked every door and window and took my house keys, so I was a prisoner in my own home.

Daniel saw me thrown to the floor if Peter’s dinner was late, smacked across the mouth if I spoke out of turn and crushed under his weight against the wall if there was a single toy out of place.

One night I put Daniel to bed and did my usual thing of snuggling up next to him.

Usually I’d sleep through the night but this time I woke to hear voices downstairs, so I went to investigate. Peter was there with a slim, young blonde who he introduced as Lisa. I said: “What’s she doing here? It’s late.” Peter glared at me. “That’s none of your business. F*** off back to bed.”

I did as I was told, then heard the noises of Peter having sex — and a woman screaming.

A few nights later Lisa arrived before I’d put Daniel down. Peter told me to get rid of him and come back. When I came downstairs I froze in the doorway. They were already having sex. Peter saw me and said: “Come in and watch. You might learn something.”

She was squealing, begging him to stop, but he didn’t listen. I turned towards the stairs but Peter had other ideas. My gown and nightclothes were ripped off me and then it began. The more I cried and begged him to stop, the more he seemed to enjoy it. In the past Peter had always been quick to express his regrets, but a day or two after this latest attack I realized he hadn’t apologized.

Just 48 hours after raping me in my own lounge, it was as if he’d forgotten the whole episode.

Over the next weeks and months, there were several new faces in the house — sometimes Lisa, sometimes other girls my age or younger.

Sometimes I was forced to watch them, sometimes they were forced to watch me being subjected to Peter’s violent fantasies.

I began to plan my escape. I had my secret bag of 10ps, scrounged and found, and I had my plan. I just needed the opportunity.

Then one afternoon Peter told me: “I’m going to a car auction. I’ll be an hour and a half.”

And he forgot to lock the door. I flew round the house, grabbing clothes, toys, essentials — as much as I could stuff into a holdall.

Then I grabbed Daniel and ran as fast as I could to the bus stop. After a ride and a long walk we arrived at Glasgow’s coach station.

It was nine hours to London Victoria. Nine hours of staring out of the coach window, paranoid that every set of headlights overtaking us would be Peter’s van, dreading each pit stop in case he stepped on.

But Cathy’s escape succeeded, though Tobin soon contacted her via her grandparents in Portsmouth, Hants. Reluctantly she allowed him contact with his son — and he promptly abducted Daniel back to Bathgate. She flew north and had to agree to submit to Tobin’s perversions once more to lure him and Daniel back down south, where he set up home in Margate, Kent. Cathy continues:

At weekends Peter began to spend whole days with Daniel and me and when he offered to have him for sleepovers, I agreed. He even impressed me by making Daniel a sandpit in the garden.

Even so, it was a relief when Peter found a two-bedroom council flat in Leigh Park in Havant, Hants. He and I then split childcare duties and for a year it was fine.

Then he began phoning me in the middle of the night, claiming he was having a heart attack and had called an ambulance, and that I needed to collect Daniel.

The morning after the fourth time it happened, in 1993, I had a call from Havant police. Peter Tobin, they said, had lured two 14-year-old girls back to his flat, where he had plied them with cider and vodka then violently raped them.

I later learned they had knocked on his door and he had invited them in while they waited for a neighbour to return. He even suggested they could play with Daniel, which put them at ease. And so began 16 hours of torture.

Peter had beaten them, tied them up then turned on the gas and left them to die. He’d jumped in his blue Metro and driven away, just after handing my son over to me.

Fortunately, one of the girls had got free and called for help. Peter was found and jailed for 14 years.

He was freed in 2004, then in 2006 he was arrested for the murder of a young Polish girl called Angelika Kluk in Glasgow.

In November 2007 police found a dismembered body, this time under the sandpit in the garden of Peter’s old home in Margate. Yet again, he had used his son to put his victim at her ease.

DNA tests established the body was that of a young girl from Scotland, Vicky Hamilton, who had gone missing in the Bathgate area in February 1991.

Perhaps she normally wouldn’t have accepted a lift from a stranger but it was snowing and seeing the man’s young son next to him must have reassured her. If it was Daniel in the van, it must have been the weekend Peter had abducted him.

The police were confident he did not see anything happen between Peter and Vicky, but he must have been in the house with the girl’s dead body. And when I flew up on my rescue mission, so must I.

When police in Margate dug up Peter’s sandpit, it was in the hunt for young hitchhiker Dinah McNicol who, they concluded, had been picked up by Peter on the A3 out of Hampshire in August 1991.

The child’s booster seat in the back of the car would have pushed any fears out of the 18-year-old’s mind but she was not seen again until her body was dug up 16 years later in the same Margate garden.

It made me sick that Daniel and I were the reason Peter had been on the A3 that day.

Adapted by MARTIN PHILLIPS from Escape From Evil by Cathy Wilson with Jeff Hudson, published by Pan Macmillan. To order a copy for £6.64, call 0845 271 2136 or go to thesunbookshop.co.uk.

Also available on kindle uk.

Even in this small excerpt you can see how he manipulated people and how important control is. This is common in serial killers not just Tobin. You can see how the people in his life are just there as tools, things to help him get what he wants.

I hope that Daniel is getting help, extensive counseling. I can only imagine the guilt, confusion and fear that has to have developed in him.

I have not read the book yet but I do plan on it.

A BBC interview with Ms. Wilson.

Victim of Serial Killer Outraged!

The man who cheated death at the hands of serial killer Dennis Nilsen has condemned a decision to give the murderer cash for a human rights claim.

Dennis Nilsen, who killed at least 17 men in the 1970s and 1980s has been awarded £55,000 to take his case to the European Court of Human Rights to try to publish his autobiography.

Carl David Stotter, 50, of Brighton, said he was enraged to hear Nilsen, who tried to suffocate and drown him, has been given aid – even though the victim has not received a penny in compensation for his ordeal.

Nilsen was refused permission to publish his manuscript by the highest courts in Britain so has taken his case to the European Court in Strasbourg.

That court makes the decision on whether to give him the money to argue his case, but the British government will end up footing the bill.

Mr Stotter said: “Why should he have his human rights when his victims haven’t any?

“It’s not justice.”

“This happened to be 29 years ago and I’ll never forgot it.”

“I feel really angry, but this is not just about me. It is about all the people he killed too.”

“I stopped Nilsen having his book published once before and we won, but no one told me he was going to try again.”

“This is not right. There is less help for victims than killers.”

“I have not received a penny of help from anyone.”

“I was the only one of his victims left to be able to seek compensation and I got nothing.”

**From me: There were others that survived Nilsen.  (Andrew Ho, Douglas Stewart, Paul Nobbs)  See below.

From here.

This is a travesty of justice. There is NO way Nilsen should get money to file this claim. he is prison and that should restrict his ‘rights’.

If he wants to sue he should have to come up with the money himself. Why are we rewarding him in any way?

I would actually read his book but I think and money should be given to the victims and their families.

Victims

  • Murder 1, Stephen Dean Holmes: Nilsen’s first murder took place on 30 December 1978. Nilsen claimed to have met his first victim in a gay bar. Nilsen strangled him with a necktie until he was unconscious and then drowned him in a bucket of water. On 12 January 2006, it was announced that the victim had been identified as Stephen Dean Holmes, who was born on 22 March 1964 and was therefore only 14 at the time; Holmes had been on his way home from a concert. On 9 November 2006, Nilsen finally confessed to the murder of Holmes in a letter sent from his prison cell to the Evening StandardNilsen was not charged for the murder as the Crown Prosecution Service decided that a prosecution would not be in the public interest.
  • Between the first and second murders, Nilsen attempted to murder Andrew Ho, a student from Hong Kong he had met in The Salisbury public house in St. Martin’s Lane. Although afterwards he confessed to the police about the incident no charges were brought and Nilsen was not arrested.
  • Murder 2, Kenneth Ockendon: The second next victim was 23-year-old Canadian student Kenneth Ockendon. Nilsen met the tourist in a pub on 3 December 1979 and escorted him on a tour of Central London, after which they went back to Nilsen’s flat for another drink. Nilsen strangled him with the cord of his headphones whilst Ockendon was listening to a record. Ockendon was one of the few murder victims who was reported as a missing person.
  • Murder 3, Martyn Duffey: Martyn Duffey was a 16-year-old runaway from Birkenhead. On 17 May 1980, he accepted Nilsen’s invitation to come over to his place. Nilsen strangled and subsequently drowned Duffey in the kitchen sink.
  • Murder 4, Billy Sutherland: Billy Sutherland was a 26-year-old father-of-one from Scotland who worked as a prostitute. Sutherland met Nilsen in a pub in August, 1980. Nilsen could not remember how he murdered Sutherland; however, it was later revealed that Sutherland had been strangled by bare hands.
  • Murder 5, Unidentified: The fifth next victim was another man who worked as a prostitute; however, this man was never identified. All that is known is that he was probably from the Philippines orThailand.
  • Murder 6, Unidentified: Nilsen could recall very little about this and the following two victims. All that Nilsen could remember about the sixth man was that he was a young Irish labourer that Nilsen had met in the Cricklewood Arms.
  • Murder 7, Unidentified: Nilsen described the seventh victim as a starving “hippy-type” whom Nilsen had found sleeping in a doorway in Charing Cross.
  • Murder 8, Unidentified: Nilsen could recall little about his eighth victim, except that he kept the man’s body under the floorboards of his flat, until he removed the corpse and cut it into three pieces then put it back again. He burned the corpse one year later.
  • At some point between murders 6 and 8, on 10 November 1980, Nilsen attacked a Scottish barman named Douglas Stewart, whom Nilsen met at the Golden Lion in Dean Street. Stewart woke up while being strangled, and was able to fend off his attacker. Although Stewart called the police almost immediately after the attack, the officers refused to take action; reportedly they considered the incident to be a domestic disagreement.
  • Murder 9, Unidentified: The ninth next victim was a young Scottish man who Nilsen met in the Golden Lion pub in Soho in January, 1981.
  • Murder 10, Unidentified: Another young Scottish man. Nilsen strangled him with a tie and placed the body under the floorboards.
  • Murder 11, Unidentified: Nilsen picked up his eleventh victim in Piccadilly Circus. The man was an English skinhead and had a tattoo around his neck reading “cut here”. The man had boasted to Nilsen about how tough he was and how he liked to fight. However, once he was drunk, he proved no match for Nilsen, who hung the man’s naked torso in his bedroom for a day, before burying the body under the floorboards.
  • Murder 12, Malcom Barlow: The 12th next victim was a 24-year-old named Malcolm Barlow. Nilsen murdered Barlow on 18 September 1981. Nilsen found Barlow in a doorway not far from his own home, took him in, and called an ambulance for him. When Barlow was released the next day, he returned to Nilsen’s home to thank him and was pleased to be invited in for a meal and a few drinks. Nilsen murdered Barlow that night. Barlow was the final victim to be murdered at Melrose Avenue.

In October 1981, Nilsen moved to a new house in Muswell Hill.

  • In November 1981, Nilsen targeted Paul Nobbs, a student, at the Golden Lion in Soho, and invited Nobbs back to his new home. The student awoke the next morning with little recollection of the previous evening’s events, and later went to see his doctor because of some bruising that had appeared on his neck. The doctor revealed that it appeared as if the student had been strangled, and advised him to go to the police. However, Nobbs was concerned about what would happen if his sexual orientation were to be disclosed, and did not go to the police.
  • Following this, Nilsen targeted Carl Stotter *, a drag queen known as Khara Le Fox at The Black Cap, in Camden. After passing out from strangulation, Stotter became conscious while Nilsen was trying to drown him in a bath of cold water. Stotter managed to gasp air four times before losing consciousness. Nilsen’s dog then lapped Stotter’s face and uncovered signs of life.[citation neededNilsen then led Stotter to a railway station, through a forest and the two parted ways. Stotter, due to memory loss from the event and alcohol before, reportedly didn’t realise for several years that he had almost been killed.[citation needed]
  • Murder 13, John Howlett: Howlett had first met Nilsen in a West End pub in December 1981. In March, 1982, John Howlett was the first victim to be murdered in Nilsen’s Muswell Hill home. Howlett was one of the few who was able to fight back; however, Nilsen had taken a dislike to him and was determined that he should die. There was a tremendous struggle, in which at one point Howlett even tried to strangle Nilsen back. Eventually, Nilsen drowned Howlett, holding his head under water for five minutes. Nilsen dismembered Howlett’s body, hid some of Howlett’s body parts around the house and flushed others down the toilet.
  • Murder 14, Graham Allen: Graham Allen was another troubled man; a father, originally from Scotland, whom Nilsen met in Shaftesbury Avenue in September, 1982. Nilsen took Allen to his home and prepared an omelette for him. Nilsen crept up on Allen while he was eating and strangled him to death. After murdering Allen, Nilsen left Allen’s body in the bath, unsure how to dispose of it. After three days, Nilsen dismembered him, like his previous victim. Parts of Allens’ remains were what led to the drains being blocked at the flats where Nilsen lived.
  • Murder 15, Stephen Sinclair: Nilsen’s final victim was a 20-year-old man named Stephen Sinclair who was addicted to drugs and alcohol. Nilsen targeted Sinclair in Oxford Street and bought the youth a hamburger. Nilsen then suggested that they go back to his place. After Sinclair drank alcohol and used heroin at Nilsen’s house, Nilsen strangled Sinclair and dismembered Sinclair’s body. Nilsen recalled that the youth’s wrists were covered in slash marks from where Sinclair had recently tried to kill himself. This murder was on 26 January 1983, less than two weeks before Nilsen was arrested. It was Sinclair’s dismembered remains in the drain outside Nilsen’s home that first alerted the police to Nilsen’s murders.[citation needed]   

Serial Killer Jeffery Guillory’s Trial Begins.

(CBS/AP) BATON ROUGE, La. – Jury selection is set to begin Monday afternoon in the second-degree murder trial of suspected serial killer Jeffery Lee Guillory.

The 45-year-old Guillory is charged in the strangulation of 46-year-old Renee Newman of Baton Rouge.

Guillory was arrested in December 2009 and booked in the deaths of Newman, Florida Edwards and Sylvia Cobb. Police have said Guillory has twice denied knowing Newman or Edwards, although his DNA matched evidence found at both women’s crime scenes.

An East Baton Rouge Parish grand jury indicted Guillory in May 2010 only in the killing of Newman.

Her body was found April 11, 2002.

Guillory reportedly remains a suspect in several other unsolved killings of women in Baton Rouge that occurred in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Here

An interesting twist in this case is that there is a chance that serial killer Sean Vincent Gillis  might be called  to testify.

Attorneys for suspected serial murderer Jeffery Lee Guillory have subpoenaed convicted serial killer Sean Vincent Gillis to testify at Guillory’s upcoming trial and have requested Gillis’ taped police interviews and interrogations, one of Guillory’s attorneys said Wednesday.

Whether Gillis actually takes the witness stand at Guillory’s second-degree murder trial, set for Sept. 19, remains to be seen because the defense cannot call Gillis to the stand if all he intends to do is assert his Fifth Amendment protection against self-incrimination.

Guillory’s defense team contends Gillis associated with Renee Newman, the 46-year-old Baton Rouge woman Guillory is accused of killing in 2002.

State District Judge Tony Marabella said Wednesday he will make a determination Sept. 13 regarding Gillis’ “status as a witness in this case.’’

“Mr. Gillis needs to decide what he wants to do. If he pleads the Fifth, the question is why,’’ Franz Borghardt, one of Guillory’s court-appointed attorneys, said after a hearing in the case.

Authorities have alleged that Guillory and Gillis targeted women who led high-risk lifestyles.

Full story

I doubt that Gillis will testify but there is a chance that he will ‘play along’ for the attention. What are they going to do to him if he agrees and then pleads the 5th? Give him a contempt of court charge?

 

Guillory is also mentioned as a potential suspect in the Jennings Louisiana Killings.

Though Guillory has been in jail since last year on unrelated charges, detectives are also investigating whether he could be involved in a series of murders in Jennings, Louisiana, where cops believe a serial killer is on the loose.

So far, eight women in the town of just 10,546 people have been killed between 2005 and this past August. Many of the murders took place before Guillory was sent to jail on the unrelated charge.

From here

I have a page on Shutterfly about the unsolved serial murders in Jennings, Louisiana. There are many videos and news links there.

I do not think that that he is the killer in any of the Jennings case though.

The Multi-Agency Task Force in Jefferson Davis Parish is aware of the arrest of Jeffery Guillory by the Baton Rouge Police Department.

Although Jeffery Guillory has been on the Task Force’s radar since his arrest by the Jennings Police Department in May 2007, it is important to note that he has been incarcerated since January 25, 2008, and, therefore, could not be responsible for the deaths of Laconia “Muggy” Brown, Crystal Shay Benoit Zeno, Brittney Gary or Necole Guillory.

Jeffery Guillory is charged in connection with the homicides of three Baton Rouge women in 1999, 2001, and 2002. Law Enforcement has remained diligent for the last 10 years to solve those crimes. The Task Force will continue to work hard and is committed to bringing closure to the eight victims from Jefferson Davis Parish.

Anyone with information is encouraged to contact the Multi-Agency Task Force at 337-824-6662 or http://www.jeffdaviscrimes.net. The Jefferson Davis Parish Sheriff’s Office, the Jefferson Davis Parish District Attorney’s Office and the FBI are offering a reward of up to $85,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for these murders.

From Here

I think some in law enforcement were just hoping that it could be him.

Reinaldo Rivera Still on Death Row

Updates come in the mail every few months on letterhead from the Georgia attorney general’s office. But, they rarely say anything new the family of a slain army sergeant cares to hear about death row inmate Reinaldo Rivera.

The last update explained holdups with the death penalty related to concerns that a drug used in executions might cause the inmate pain.

“His pain that he suffers is far less than the pain caused Marni and Chrisilee,” said Wendy Knopp, older sister of Rivera’s first victim, 21-year-old Army Sgt. Marni Glista.

Sgt. Glista’s family waits on the death sentence to be carried out as the lengthy judicial process continues.

“We’re going on 11 years since Marni’s death,” said Knopp, of Puyallup, Wash. “It would be nice to have that final closure, but it’s not up to us either.”

A Richmond County Superior Court jury sentenced Rivera to death in January 2004 for Glista’s murder. Glista was found unconscious and barely breathing inside her home on Sept. 5, 2000, after being attacked the day before. She died Sept. 9 at Doctors Hospital. Glista was strangled, according to the indictment.

Rivera confessed that he raped and killed three other women. A fourth, Chrisilee Barton, survived a brutal stabbing and gave investigators clues that led to his capture.

Especially near the anniversary of Glista’s death and her July birthday, the family wonders what her life would be like today if not for Rivera.

“She was married. Would she have kids; what would her career path look like?” Knopp said.

The death sentence appeal of the serial rapist and killer moved to the Georgia Supreme Court, where a decision to review his request for habeas corpus should be issued by the end of March.

Most recently, Rivera’s lawyer for the habeas petition was granted a 10-day extension by the courts on Sept. 6 to file a brief regarding the inmate’s mental competency. His lawyer, Brian Kammer from the Georgia Resource Center in Atlanta, stated that he needed more time to write a well-researched brief given the court’s demands and his workload for other death penalty cases, Hansen said.

Kammer denied a request for interview.

The state has six months to rule on the case after the court term to which it has been assigned begins this month, according to Jane Hansen, public information officer for the Georgia Supreme Court. The case will be argued through written briefs after the court denied a request to hear oral arguments in June, she said.

As Glista’s family waits on this chapter in their lives to close, they cling to their faith in God and the courts.

“For me and my family, we have a tremendous amount of faith in Christ. He is the final judge and jury,” Knopp said. “I hope the sentence is carried out. I do believe in the justice system.”

At this point in the appeals process, Rivera, who sits on death row in Jackson, Ga., is asking the Georgia Supreme Court to challenge the most recent ruling against him.

On March 31, Superior Court Judge William Fears ordered a final ruling denying Rivera’s petition for habeas.

Rivera insisted from his first confessions that he wanted a death sentence.

According to the judge’s final order, Rivera “consistently, both at trial and during these habeas proceedings, indicated that he has no desire to appeal his convictions and sentences.”

Peter Johnson, an Augusta criminal defense attorney who represented Rivera during his original trial, said Rivera’s appeal to the Georgia Supreme Court, if authorized, must continue with the original grounds of the habeas trial.

“If they deny it, then he is dead in the water,” Johnson said.

According to Johnson, the only other option for Rivera would be taking the case to the U.S. Supreme Court where he would need to raise a constitutional question with the trial. Johnson said he did not know enough about Rivera’s habeas petition to determine if that’s possible.

Richard Dieter, executive director for the Death Penalty Information Center, said the U.S. Supreme Court does not accept many death penalty appeal cases.

If Rivera chooses to take his appeal to federal courts, the process could take even more time, Dieter said.

Original Article

This whole process takes too long. the man confessed. He was found guilty. He was found sane. He had originally asked for the death penalty.

Now he says that the drugs might hurt? I have a feeling that it will hurt much less than the rapes and murders that you committed.

Why are the families still being dragged through this?

So Many Signs Missed With Budding Serial Killer

The girl did not know the tall boy with jet-black hair.

He might not have known her, either. Centennial High School is a big place.

But he wasn’t interested in a formal introduction.

As the 16-year-old girl disappeared into a school bathroom, the boy followed. And when she tried to exit her stall, he pounced.

She screamed as the boy’s hands clamped around her throat. He forced her back into the stall and jammed her against the toilet.

It’s unclear how long the assault in 2009 lasted. It ended after another student heard screams and followed the sound into the bathroom.

That student was the person who later identified the boy to Clark County School District police: Javier Righetti, then 17, and now charged with murder in the brutal rape and killing of 15-year-old Alyssa Otremba over Labor Day weekend.

Because Righetti was a minor, the juvenile court sealed the case. The Review-Journal learned about the Centennial incident through multiple sources with knowledge of the offense.

Experts now say the attack may have been the first documented incident in a pattern of behavior pointing to a budding serial killer.

Righetti, now 19, was expelled from Centennial, in the northwest valley, after the 2009 assault. He was charged with felony kidnapping, coercion and battery, according to sources. He was sentenced to one year at the Caliente Youth Center, a secure facility.

What troubled investigators — at the time of the Centennial assault and again after Otremba’s death — was that Righetti was not charged with a sex offense in the bathroom attack.

Because of that, he probably wasn’t treated as a potential sex offender while incarcerated, said Alexis Kennedy, a criminal justice professor at UNLV and an expert in youth sex offenses.

“If he wasn’t charged with anything sexually related, they probably wouldn’t have done a sex offender assessment,” Kennedy said. “It wouldn’t have been on their radar.”

Rehabilitation is the primary goal of juvenile justice, Kennedy said. But how do you fix a sex offender if you don’t know he’s a sex offender?

Katherine Ramsland, a criminal justice professor at DeSales University in Pennsylvania and an expert on serial killers, said courts are hesitant to label juveniles.

Although authorities may have suspected Righetti was a potential sex offender, labeling him as one in 2009 would have been premature without additional evidence.

“No matter what their opinions were, if you overreach and label a kid as a sex offender, that could be detrimental for life,” she said. “But this kid has shown, he was on his way.”

I understand not classifying the kid publicly but we, as a society, have to warn officials.  Since he did not get ‘help’ (although I wonder if there is help for serial killers even as teens) the local police and school system should have been told.

Actually I can not understand why he was not forced into some kind of therapy in the juvenile facility. That should be mandatory.

The similarities between the 2009 assault and Otremba’s killing were striking.

In both cases, Righetti was accused of approaching a girl whom he did not know in a busy area. In the first case, it was at school; in the second, a well-lit, heavily traveled street.

In both cases, the motivation was sexual, sources said. But in the Centennial incident, there was no physical proof of a sexual assault.

“He just didn’t have time to do anything to her. This guy was a sick puppy,” said one source, who requested anonymity.

Otremba was not as fortunate.

The Arbor View High School freshman was raped before being stabbed more than 40 times, Las Vegas police said. Her body was then doused with gasoline and set ablaze.

Righetti confessed to police, according to his arrest report. In the interview with detectives, Righetti also admitted to another rape and robbery. Detectives are investigating those claims as Righetti awaits his fate in the Clark County jail.

One law enforcement source called Righetti a “monster” who was already a serial rapist with a growing compulsion to kill.

Ramsland agreed, assessing that the suspect fits the profile of a budding serial killer.

“He’s got the anger issues, he uses weapons, he has brutalized people, he takes risk, and he’s starting young,” she said. “Those are all pretty big red flags.”

Why was not addressed while he was locked up? Why was he allowed to go free?

In both incidents, authorities said Righetti attacked girls despite a high probability of being caught.

That’s an impulse act, as opposed to a calculated plan, Ramsland said.

“The opportunity was there, and he had the compulsion to act,” she said. “The driving need usually comes from a rich fantasy life where he (a serial killer) does things like that. When he sees an opportunity to actually do it, he may act.

“Only after the feelings recede does he realize the risk he took,” she said.

Kennedy said it’s natural to cast blame toward authorities after a heinous event, but predicting behavior in teenagers is an imprecise science.

“Human behavior is so hard to predict,” she said. “This was the worst possible outcome of the worst possible scenario.”

Because juvenile records are sealed, the public doesn’t know exactly how Righetti’s case was handled.

Kennedy said the “choking” aspect of the Centennial incident should have concerned authorities. That’s a sign of escalating violent tendencies, she said.

Could Otremba’s death have been prevented? No one can know, Kennedy said. Even in the best-case scenario, with all the right treatment and therapy, Kennedy said sex offenders may relapse.

“Everyone in corrections at juvenile justice is saying, ‘I hope I haven’t had this person,’ ” Kennedy said.

“Every system that had contact with him is second-guessing themselves, looking at what they might have done differently.”

They should be second guessing themselves. This kid was a time bomb and no one seems to even have tried to diffuse him.

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