Archive for the ‘ Currently Readng ’ Category

Families of killers, forgotten victims.

“Moore is a part of an exclusive group, those who share blood relations with someone perceived by the public as a monster: a mass murderer. With that unenviable tie can come isolation, guilt, grief, fear, disbelief, even post-traumatic stress disorder, in addition to a very public stigma.
In the aftermath of a massacre, questions and criticism are frequently directed at the parents, spouses and children of the accused. The public sometimes sympathizes, often criticizes and even goes so far as to blame family members for the actions of their kin.”

 

Families of killers and what they go through.

So often forgotten victims.

Susan Klebold said in an essay:

“For the rest of my life, I will be haunted by the horror and anguish Dylan caused. I cannot look at a child in a grocery store or on the street without thinking about how my son’s schoolmates spent the last moments of their lives. Dylan changed everything I believed about my self, about God, about family, and about love. I think I believed that if I loved someone as deeply as I loved him, I would know if he were in trouble. My maternal instincts would keep him safe. But I didn’t know. And my instincts weren’t enough. And the fact that I never saw tragedy coming is still almost inconceivable to me. I only hope my story can help those who can still be helped. I hope that, by reading of my experience, someone will see what I missed.”

 

I can not even begin to imagine that, how she feels. It has to horrible.

 

Melissa worried that she might also be a killer, a bad person or have some kind of evil inside of her due to her father being a serial killer.

““When I was growing up, my dad had put so much pride in my last name, and he gave me lessons on how to be a good citizen,” Moore said. “My name was now known for these horrific murders, and it started to make me wonder if I was like my dad.”
Brown says it’s normal for the family members of killers to doubt their own moral integrity. The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree, right?”

 

Imagine for 1 second growing up with that fear inside of you. I can’t. It speaks of her courage, that she went on.

 

There is also often a survivor’s guilt for the families of the killers.

“Mildred Muhammad’s ex-husband and father of her three children, John Allen Muhammad, terrorized the Washington, D.C., area with random sniper attacks in 2002.
Soon, there were reports of shootings throughout the Washington metropolitan area. Once John Muhammad was captured, there were whispers that he had done it to get his ex-wife’s attention.
At first, Mildred Muhammad thought that if she’d only stayed with him, he would have killed her instead of killing 10 innocent strangers and wounding three. The guilt and disbelief were overwhelming.

It’s difficult to grasp the reality that a family member could cause nationwide sorrow, said forensic psychiatrist Helen Morrison, who has profiled dozens of killers. Also hard is the realization that it’s not the family’s fault.
Morrison said it’s imperative to get the individual to talk about their experience — their feelings, their doubt, their anger, their distress — and try to put that in a perspective that finally leads them to say, “It’s not my fault.”

 

This poor woman blamed herself for not being killed.

 

I can hope that there will not be anymore murders, but I don’t think that is a hope I can really expect to come to being.

So, I hope that in the face of a tragic event people can remember that the killer is alone in their blame.

The families are victims as well, even if that is hard to process.

Shattered Silence from Melissa Moore here.

Susan Klebold’s essay here.

Far From the Tree here.

Another excellent book on this subject, We Need to Talk About Kevin. This is a fictional account but it still has a lot of insight into this subject.

FOX 4 Kansas City WDAF-TV | News, Weather, Sports

By Sarah LeTrent

(CNN) — “Missy, you need to change your last name,” the shackled man in the orange prison jumpsuit said into the receiver, staring blankly at his 15-year-old daughter’s tear-stained face.

“That’s when I knew that these things were true,” recalls Melissa Moore, now 33.

Until that day, the man behind the glass partition, Keith Hunter Jesperson, was simply her father; the one who used to tuck her into bed at night “like a burrito.”

Now, in her eyes, he was also the convicted serial killer plucked straight from the newspaper headlines who was serving multiple life sentences; the one who had bloodied her family name forever.

Jesperson, the so-called “Happy Face Killer,” murdered eight women when he was a long-haul truck driver in the early 1990s. Jesperson earned his nickname by sending confessions to journalists and police departments around the country to gain notoriety, signing the admissions…

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Gacy’s blood may solve old murders

http://usat.ly/TB5Qpz Gacy’s blood may solve old murders Detectives have long wondered if serial killer John Wayne Gacy had other unknown victims. To view this story, click the link or paste it into your browser.

Are Parents to Blame

I read an article / review on the movie We Need to Talk About Kevin and it got me wondering. How much blame should society and does society place on the parents of monsters?

Eva  has been emotionally made empty. Her teen son Kevin went on a well-planned and executed high school killing rampage. Forced to still live in the community shattered by the massacre so she can visit Kevin in jail, she is a pariah.

The question of guilt – are the parents guilty when their children turn into serial killers? Should we blame them? Six months after the Columbine Massacre, polls showed 85 percent of Americans held the parents responsible for the shooters’ acts.

Just like Joyce Flint, Jeffrey Dahmer’s mother, Eva is condemned as a “Monster Maker”.

Eva leads a solitary life in a small run-down house. Like Joyce Flint after Dahmer’s arrest, no one will hire Eva. Finally she lands a job in a travel agency, but her co-workers refuse to even look at her. As Eva relives everything that happened, we go back through her horrifying ordeal to the beginning.

Eva was a free spirit travelling around the world in a hippie idealistic way. She married Franklin  and they moved into a New York City downtown loft. In a foreshadowing of what will come, having a child does not look to be a joyous event for Eva. We see her in the hospital room immediately after the birth. She is frozen. She is empty of feeling.

Eva cannot bond with her baby. He cries constantly. Eva can offer the baby no comfort. Kevin exhausts her with his crying.

“Mommy was happy before Kevin came along.”

Eva and Franklin move to a large suburban house with Kevin. Eva stays home trying to teach the toddler, who refuses to speak.

Kevin does not wear pants, only a diaper. He refuses to be toilet trained as he becomes older. He delights in making his mother change his feces-soiled diapers. He is cruel and verbally abusive to Eva and destroys her “room of her own” that she has lovingly decorated. In a fury, she pushes him, injuring his arm. At the hospital, Kevin lies for his mother. Now, whenever he wants something, he strokes his arm. He’s got Eva guilt-ridden and frightened.

Kevin forms a loving bond with his father to spite his mother.

Eva and Franklin need to talk about Kevin. But they never do.

Much more here 

The Original Book

I have said before that a serial / spree killer has many more victims than most realize. The ripple effect of these crimes affects so many, including the killer’s family.

Imagine being Ted Bundy’s mom for a minute. Or Dennis Rader’s kid or wife. How many times have they been asked how did they not know, how does it feel to have lived with a monster, what was he really like? Accusations, insensitive comments and the fact that you now have to live knowing that you loved a “monster”.

That seems to be what this book and movie are about. I admit I have not read the book (I am going to Kindle it soon though) and I have not seen the movie but I plan on doing both. Even without seeing them the questions stir.

Do we hold the families to blame? Should we? How much blame should be placed on the families?

I am very sympathetic to most of the families of the monsters. There are a few cases that I think the parents dropped the ball but when you boil it down to the bones it is the killer who is to blame for their own actions, no one else.

I have met many people who came from horrid families and upbringings that grow into wonderful adults. I have known abused children who grow up to help others in many ways. Somewhere these people make the choice to be positive, good people.

I believe that the killers make the choice to kill. No matter how they were raised they are the only ones that can stop themselves. The killers are the only ones that can start killing.

Even if Johnny the Homicidal Maniac had gotten a few more hugs and cookies while growing up he’d still have went on to be a killer.

In the case of teens I do look towards the parents a little bit more. Not so much to blame for the killing but to see how much could have been prevented.

In the Columbine Massacre Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold were building bombs and stockpiling weapons in their parent’s homes. Other people had come to the parents with concerns and the two had been in some trouble before. The parents ignored red flags. The parents were not abusive but they obviously did not pay much attention to what their kids did.

Do I think that the massacre could have been stopped?

 

Well, I do wonder if the parents had looked for and found the stashed weapons, separated the boys and got them some serious mental health care could it have been prevented? Possibly. Then again, it might have only delayed the action to a later date.

I can not say that the parents are to blame for the actual killing. Those 2 seemed determined to kill and there may have been nothing anyone could do to fully prevent it. I will admit that I think both sets of parents sucked at being parents (provide things but that is really it) but I can not blame them for the massacre. I do point at them for not noticing the small arsenal which included homemade bombs.

I say that on Tuesday, April 20, 1999 the only ones planting bombs and shooting at people were Dylan and Eric. They are to blame for the deaths. No matter what it was ultimately their decision to go on a killing spree rather than doing something or anything else.

I think that in most cases the family of the killer is another victim. I think it is a shame when socitety adds to their pain by pointing fingers. I know that people just want to make sense of things, they want to understand how and Why the killings happened. They want to blame someone for the killing and pointing at a monster carries only so much satisfaction once the monster is caged.

What are your thoughts?

 

The Liebster Blog Award

The Liebster Blog Award is given to bloggers who have less than 200 followers, all in the spirit of fostering new connections. Leibster is German & means ‘dearest’ or ‘beloved’ but it can also mean ‘favorite’ .

From The Tale of My Heart

The Mad Hatters  nominated me for this award!!!

*HUGS*

I am at a loss.

Besides ” Thank You” I have NO clue what to say.

So thank you Mad Hatters. I enjoy reading your blog and I am thrilled to know that you enjoy reading mine.

If you have not visited the Mad Hatters do so NOW! You will laugh, you will cry and sometimes make that head tilt that dogs make. It is a great blog!

Part of the nomination is nominating at least 5 others. I have no problem with that considering the great blogs that I read.

I do not know if I can send the nomination back to The Mad Hatters (a little bit of this; a little bit of that kind of blog), if i can, I do!

Friggin Loon (Randomness at it’s best)

Hey From Japan (The next best thing to moving to Japan yourself)

Anguished Repose (Science, Poetry, Gifs. Really smart, makes me itch. )

Socialpsychol (The Horrors, Oh The Horrors)

I Want Ice Water (Anarchy and Zen)

The Blog Of Otis (Kitties lead the congregation)

The Charlie Project Blog (True crime / Missing Persons)

The Byronic Man (I still haven’t figured this one out.)

Gimcrack Hospital (Odd and Interesting Facts and History)

Sh*t My 6-year-old Says (The wisdom of youth. Seriously, this kid will one day rule the planet)

PUMA Bydesign (Political insight)

I Hakiku  (Art in so many forms)

Rumpydog (Pets writing blogs and on Facebook)

The Writer’s Forensics Blog (Title kind of says it all)

The Good Greatsby (His Ego makes me giggle)

Evil Sits At The Dinner Table (Child Abuse Advocate / True Crime)

Aussie Criminals and Crooks (Australian True Crime)

Prawned and Quartered (The A-Team, Autism and so much more)

(I think they all fit the criteria)

The National Museum of Crime and Punishment

(Courtesy National Museum of Crime and Punishment) – An exhibit board explains the history of the Unabomber.

 By Jessica Goldstein
The newest exhibit at the National Museum of Crime and Punishment focuses on the Unabomber, whose explosives kept the United States on edge for almost two decades. It’s no surprise that the gallery is captivating; we’re a nation fascinated by, well, crime and punishment. Kids play cops and robbers in the back yard while teenagers quote “The Godfather” and their parents turn to HBO, enthralled by “The Sopranos.” “Law and Order”is on TV so often it’s a surprise there’s ever any other show on the air. Violence terrifies and murder repulses, yet those are the stories we watch, rapt, as they unfold on the news one gruesome detail at a time. The NMCP provides an array of artifacts, information and interactive exhibits to satisfy an insatiable desire to know more about crimes, those who commit them and those who work to solve them. Allow two to three hours to explore the five galleries: “A Notorious History of American Crime,” “Punishment: The Consequence of Crime,” “Crime Fighting,” “Crime Scene Investigation” and “ ‘America’s Most Wanted’ Studio.”Required reading: Ted Kaczynski, the Unabomber, was responsible for 16 attacks, three deaths and 23 injuries in 17 years. In early 1995, The Washington Post and the New York Times received a 67-page manifesto from the Unabomber promising to stop the bombings if the essay was published. After consulting with the FBI, the papers split the cost of publication, and the manifesto ran in The Post on Sept. 19, 1995. In February of the next year, the FBI got a tip from David Kaczynski, who recognized his brother’s voice and philosophy in the writing.
Kiss Kiss Bang Bang: Bonnie and Clyde’s car — the one in which they were killed after running from the law for years — is on display, along with background information about two of America’s most famous criminals. The car is riddled with bullet holes from the attack that took the lovers down. Clyde died instantly, but Bonnie wasn’t as lucky; the shooters heard a “long, horrified scream” emanating from the car as they continued to fire.No, not that Cullen: In a room devoted to serial killers, visitors can learn about some of the most horrific murderers ever to strike in the United States. Charles Cullen, the former nurse who became the most prolific serial killer in history, was arrested in 2003. He showed signs of instability in early childhood, attempting suicide at 9 by drinking chemicals from a chemistry set in what was to be the first of 20 tries .Hurrah, hurrah, Pennsylvania: The word “penitentiary” comes from the Pennsylvania Quakers, who held the conviction that salvation could be achieved through penitence and self-reflection. In 1790, the Walnut Street Prison opened in Philadelphia; it was the first U.S. penitentiary and a pioneer in prison reform. Eastern State Penitentiary, now perhaps most famous as the site of one of the best Halloween haunted houses on the East Coast, opened in 1829 and used the “Pennsylvania system” of solitary confinement as a form of rehabilitation, designed to make prisoners feel remorse.Take a bite out of crime: McGruff, the trench-coat-wearing canine who has been baring his teeth at criminal activity since 1980, is all over the museum. Kids can keep an eye out for his questions posted throughout the exhibits about things like safety, taking candy from strangers and cyberbullying. Every now and then, McGruff himself hangs out in front of the museum. Look for him to be greeting visitors, posing for pictures and probably sweating his poor puppy face off.Target practice: An interactive exhibit allows you to sit in the driver’s seat, surrounded by screens for total immersion, as you act the part of a police officer chasing down a runaway suspect. Test your shooting skills with the firearms training system used by FBI agents. The video simulation is footage of a real house (with real people, in case you are squeamish about violence) as you pretend to conduct a raid.

CSI: Washington: The museum knows what you’re thinking about fighting crime: “Yeah, but is it like ‘CSI’?” In an effort to address the common inquiry head-on, the museum offers its most popular exhibit, “The CSI Experience.” You begin as the unsuspecting witness to suspicious behavior, then travel to the crime scene, collect evidence and head to the crime lab. On weekends, the museum runs CSI-themed workshops. Led by forensic scientists, the hands-on activities cover evidence collection, DNA, body decomposition and basic forensics.

Removing the evidence: Visit the Cop Shop to pick up a body-outline towel, a crime scene “do not cross” scarf that resembles yellow tape, and plenty of other crime-fighting and CSI-themed wares.

National Museum of Crime and Punishment

575 Seventh St. NW. 202-393-1099. www.crimemuseum.org . Hours: Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.- 7 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the gate. Adults online $18.95, gate $21.95; seniors, U.S. military and U.S. law enforcement online $15.95, gate $16.95; children ages 5-11 $14.95; children younger than 5, free.

From Here

I would actually like to go. I think it could be interesting. A little morbid but interesting.

It would not just be for the serial killers, but to get a peek into not only criminal minds but into the investigative minds.

I’d love to go on the weekend, to take the C.S.I. workshop, though I am sure it is more ‘fun’ than true investigation. Maybe not though, maybe they are reacting to the whole “True Crime TV” issue (the general public / juries wanting & expecting  the Smoking Gun moment that is so common on TV) and showing the public the truth. I hope so.

The Author of Dexter Speaks About Serial Killers

Sympathy for the Devils

By JEFF LINDSAY

I MAKE my living writing about a serial killer. It’s a pretty good living, and quite frankly, that surprises me. When I wrote my first book, “Darkly Dreaming Dexter,” the story of a sympathetic killer, I thought I was writing something creepy, repellent, perhaps a little wicked. To balance that, I also made him vulnerable and funny, I gave him a fondness for children, and I wrote in the first person — all elements intended to bridge the gap between a homicidal psychopath and readers, who I assumed would, nevertheless, be appalled.

They weren’t; they liked him. Before publication, a nice-looking yenta from marketing took me aside and confessed, “I maybe shouldn’t say? But I have such a crush on Dexter.” So did other readers. The book took off like a dark little rocket. One of the early reviews even said it “breathes new life into the genre,” which meant there was a serial killer genre.

I found that amazing: I had done the darkest, least lovable thing I could think of, and a whole genre was there ahead of me.

People, I realized, like to read about serial killers. And as I found myself on the telephone with Hollywood, arranging for Dexter’s translation into a series for Showtime, I began to think that was pretty funny. “Lovable serial killer.” Ha ha ha.

And then bodies turn up in real life and it isn’t funny anymore.

This time, it’s along a beach on Long Island. Our shock blooms as phrases pop out from the news coverage: “at least eight bodies” and “three or even four killers.” We read more — we can’t help it. We’re sickened and disgusted, but we need to know. And the more we know about the scene, the more we really are horrified. The ghastly image of this beach as a dumping ground for bodies is bad enough. But then four of the bodies, wrapped in burlap, are thought to be the work of one person: a serial killer.

There’s a special sense of dread that comes with that phrase, “serial killer.” It represents an inhuman psychology that is beyond us, and because of that, we can’t look away.

We can all conceive of killing someone in self-defense, or in combat. But to kill repeatedly, because we want to, because we like to — that’s so far outside ordinary human understanding that we can’t possibly have an empathetic response. The word “evil” seems a bit quaint and biblical — but what else can we call it?

I was brought up to believe that death and money are private, and I was taught to have only contempt for people who slowed down to gawk at an accident. I can’t help feeling that this is similar — but I watch, too. Have I become what my mother called a rubbernecker and what my father, more bluntly, called an idiot?

Maybe so, but I have lots of company. Not just Americans, either; the Dexter series has been translated into 38 languages, and sensational news of serial killers regularly floods in from Russia, China, all over the world. People everywhere are willing voyeurs to mayhem. And when we learn of serial murders like the recent case at Gilgo Beach, our “dark watcher,” that small part of us that just can’t turn away, perks up and pays attention.

This isn’t necessarily a bad thing. We don’t become evil because we dwell on it. In fact, one reason we gawk is to reassure ourselves that we could never do such a thing. When we stare at carnage we feel fear and revulsion, and that tells us with certainty that creating this kind of horror is beyond us.

And it is. Serial killers are psychopaths, and current research in brain mapping indicates that psychopaths are born, not made. There is an actual, physical, difference in their brains; you can’t become a serial killer by reading about one, any more than you can get magical powers from reading “Harry Potter.” You can watch “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” 20 times and it will not inspire you to butcher the neighbors. We can no more move from watcher to killer than we can breathe water.

But a homicidal psychopath — a serial killer — delights in killing. He often taunts the rest of us in some way as part of his fun. The evil creature that has been dumping bodies on Gilgo Beach has used his victim’s cellphone to call her sister.

It’s inhuman cruelty, but the research I read to write my “Dexter” books predicts that, when they catch him, he will probably look just like us. He will be known as a charming and thoughtful co-worker, a nice man who helps his ailing neighbor carry her groceries, and no one will have suspected what he really is.

This is the theater of paranoia, and it grips us, too, because we need a way to see the clues that must be there. Who among your friends and colleagues might be staring at your back and sharpening a knife?

You can’t know; but by watching, you know it could never be you. I think that’s good. We can’t deny that evil exists — but it’s not who we are. And the existence of evil implies its opposite: there is good, too.

As ordinary human beings, we live somewhere in the middle, jerked back and forth by circumstance, never quite reaching either extreme. And if you never understand someone who lives at the evil pole, no matter how much you rubberneck, that’s good.

It means you’re only human.

Jeff Lindsay is the author, most recently, of “Dexter Is Delicious.”

A version of this op-ed appeared in print on June 25, 2011, on page A19 of the New York edition with the headline: Sympathy for the Devils.

NY Times

New York Serial Killer Base Profile

Known Victims To Date

Victims: Top (L to R): Molly Jean Dilts, Shannan Gilbert and Tracy Ann Roberts; Middle (Lto R): Melissa Barthelemy, Barbara Breidor and Kim Raffo; Bottom (L to R):Maureen Brainard-Barnes, Megan Waterman, Amber Lynn Costello

Criminologists have begun to piece together a profile of the serial killer responsible for the murder of up to 13 prostitutes in Long Island and Atlantic city.

According to experts, the man poilce are looking for is a white male in his mid 20’s to mid 40’s,  financially secure, well spoken and drives a nice car or truck.

Able to charm his Craigslist victims into a false sense of security, he will also have access to burlap sacks as part of his job and will have been treated for poison ivy infections received as he disposed of the bodies in thick undergrowth.

The New York Times came up with the chilling portrait after talking to retired and current criminal profilers familiar with the ‘Craigslist ripper’ case.

Speaking to the paper, Scott Bonn, an assistant professor of sociology at Drew University in Madison, N.J. said: ‘This is someone who can walk into a room and seem like your average Joe.

Who Is The Craigslist Ripper

Profilers have described the man as:

  • He is most likely a white male in his mid-20s to mid-40s
  •  He is married or has a girlfriend. He is well educated and well spoken.
  • He is financially secure, has a job and owns an expensive car or truck.
  •  He may have sought treatment at a hospital for poison ivy infection.
  • As part of his job or interests, he has access to, or a stockpile of, burlap sacks.

‘He has to be persuasive enough and rational enough that he is able to convince these women to meet him on these terms.

He has demonstrated social skills. He may even be charming.’

He is also, according to the experts, very familiar with the Long Island beaches where 10 remains have so far been found.

Jim Clemente, a retired FBI investigator in the agency’s behavioural analysis unit, added: ‘He did not stumble upon that location. He has some familiarity with it.’

The ‘Craigslist ripper’ case started in December after the disappearance of 24-year-old Shannan Gilbert, a New Jersey prostitute who advertised on the site.

Although her body has not been found, the remains of 10 others have so far been uncovered with Maureen Brainard-Barnes, 25, Melissa Barthelemy, 24, Amber Lynn Costello, 27, and  Megan Waterman, 22, the only identified victims so far.

Detectives have also investigated the possibility that the same serial killer may also be responsible for the deaths of  four prostitutes in Atlantic city in 2006.

On Long Island, police returned for another day to the area subjected to land, water and air searches by the FBI and New York authorities from Suffolk and Nassau Counties.

Their most recent discovery earlier this month was two sets of human remains, including a skull.

Nassau Detective Vincent Garcia said police hacked through brush with machetes and chainsaws and used shovels to dig through sand to look for clues.

‘When we found the skull, we were hoping if we went back in we’d find a little bit more,’ Garcia said.

Nassau officer James Imperiale said police found two human teeth about a foot from the skull. It appears the teeth are related to the skull but authorities will run tests to confirm that, he said.

Imperiale said police also found a shoe but were unsure if it was relevant to their search.

‘We’re not sure if it has anything to do with the investigation but we did take it away as well,’ he said.

Sources indicated to the paper that the killer may have a heavily ritualistic element to the way he carries out the murders.

As the first four prostitutes discovered all disappeared in July or September, Mr Clemente said: ‘There may be a seasonal nature to his connection to the area, or to his fantasy and ritual.

‘It may be the time his wife or kids or parents are away for the summer. There are many possibilities.’

The use of increasingly rare burlap sacks also provides another clue as to his modus operandi.

As burlap is no longer a commonly used material, it is more easily traced than plastic.

Mr Clemente added: ‘To me, it takes away from his forensic sophistication and criminal sophistication and adds to the possibility that he is more interested in this ritual aspect.’

The experts also focused on the sadistic element of his crimes, particularly the fact he repeatedly used one of the victim’s mobile phones to call and taunt her teenage sister.

Mr. Clemente said: ‘That gives me an idea that he is a sadist.

‘That would be reflected in his relationship and jobs.

He is the one who laughs when a cat gets run over or a kid falls off his bike. He likes the suffering of others, and he really likes it when he can cause it or witness it.’

Read more

NEW YORK, April 22 (UPI) — The killer who dumped women’s bodies on a Long Island beach east of New York City appears to be organized and methodical, profilers tell The New York Times. The newspaper interviewed several criminologists, including a former FBI profiler. Based on the information now public about the case, they said the killer is probably a white male with an age somewhere between mid 20s and mid 40s, intelligent, with some education and a job, who may live or have lived in the area near his burial ground. “This is someone who can walk into a room and seem like your average Joe,” said Scott Bonn, a sociologist at Drew University in Madison, N.J., who has researched serial killers. “He has to be persuasive enough and rational enough that he is able to convince these women to meet him on these terms. He has demonstrated social skills. He may even be charming.” So far, police have found 10 bodies on a stretch of beach off Ocean Parkway in Suffolk County but have identified only four. They all disappeared in the summer between 2007 and 2010 after advertising sexual services on Craigslist. Jim Clemente, who retired in 2009 as a supervisor in the FBI’s behavioral analysis unit, said the killer did not just stumble on his dumping ground. “He must have some familiarity with it,” he said. Behavioral analysis or profiling is not yet the exact science depicted on TV shows such as “Criminal Minds.” Thus the profile may not help police pick the killer out of the thousands of men who live in or visit that part of Long Island.

Source

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