Archive for the ‘ Child Killer ’ Category

Winston Mosley Up For Parole & Testing New Laws

Nearly half a century after the Kitty Genovese murder shocked the conscience of New York City and became a national symbol of urban apathy, her killer is coming up for parole for the 15th time. But this year the deal is a bit different for Winston Moseley, her assailant.

For the first time since he became eligible for parole in 1984, Mr. Moseley will appear before a parole board that now is being directed to look beyond his crime and criminal record, and consider if the 76-year-old who committed hideous crimes 47 years ago is the same person seeking freedom.

Nestled into budget legislation this year was a revision of Executive Law §259(c) that requires the parole board to establish and apply “risk and needs principles to measure the rehabilitation of persons appearing before the board” and the likelihood of success should the offender be released. In the past, the board “could” consider those factors; as of today it “must” consider them.

I hope that the same budget cuts that formed this law put aside money for all the criminals that will return to prison once they are pushed out.

Oh, wait. I guess the ones that pushed this figure they will be out of office by that time.   ?

Mr. Moseley will be among the first inmates evaluated under the revised system when he meets the parole board the week of Oct. 31. Advocates who have long promoted parole reform are watching the process closely. 

Halloween week, how fitting.

“We have always had a list of factors the board was supposed to consider, such as the seriousness of the crime, criminal history and participation in [rehabilitative] programs,” said Philip M. Genty, a professor at Columbia Law School and director of its Prisoners and Families Clinic who has written about the new law for the New York Law Journal (“Changes to Parole Laws Signal Potentially Sweeping Policy Shift,” Sept. 2).

The new law requires the parole board to adopt procedures that incorporate a growing body of social science research about assessing post-release needs and recidivism risks, according to Mr. Genty.

“The devil is in the details and it will depend on what regulations actually get written, but the change both rationalizes and modernizes the parole laws in ways that are long overdue,” said Mr. Genty.

The risk assessment tool is under development and is expected to be in use by November, according to Peter K. Cutler, a spokesman for the new Department of Corrections and Community Supervision, which was created this year through the merger of the prison and parole systems.

Mr. Moseley is hardly a sympathetic figure.

Records indicate that in the early morning hours of March 13, 1964, he was cruising the streets of Queens when he confronted Ms. Genovese, the 28-year-old manager of a Jamaica Avenue sports bar, after she got out of her red Fiat and began walking the 100 feet to her Kew Gardens apartment. Ms. Genovese attempted to escape, but Mr. Moseley caught her and stabbed her in the back twice as she screamed for help.

Mr. Moseley fled briefly, but when no one came to Ms. Genovese’s aid he resumed his hunt, following her trail of blood. He found her collapsed in a hallway, where he  raped and robbed her, and then stabbed her another 15 times,  including several times in the throat in an effort to silence her, according to the prosecution.

The New York Times, in an account that is disputed but nevertheless bred a legend, reported at the time that more than three dozen New Yorkers heard and ignored Ms. Genovese’s continual pleas for help as Mr. Moseley chased her down and attacked her again and again.

A month earlier, according to the prosecution, Mr. Moseley broke into a home, shot a 24-year-old woman six times and had sex with her dead body. He later explained that he had an “uncontrollable urge to kill” and claimed to have committed at least five rapes and 35 burglaries before his encounter with Ms. Genovese, according to the Queen’s District Attorney’s Office.

He killed a teenage girl and another woman. He likes killing.

Moseley quickly confessed to the Genovese killing and two others. He told cops he had killed Barbara Kralik, 15, on July 20 in Springfield Gardens, Queens, and shot Annie Mae Johnson, 24, of South Ozone Park, Queens, on February 29. Both were savage killings and may have involved sexual assault. 

Mr. Moseley was sentenced to the death penalty, although the sentence was reduced to 20 years to life.Then, in 1968, while Mr. Moseley was serving time at Attica state prison, he was brought to nearby Buffalo for minor surgery and escaped. He broke into a home in Buffalo, tied up a man and raped his wife. 

A little more detail on his escape might warrant mentioning,

In 1968, a year after the appeals court made his death sentence a life sentence Moseley was on his way to a hospital to get (tax payer funded) surgery. He overpowered a guard and proceeded to beat him to the point where the guard’s eyes were bleeding. He then stole guard’s gun.

He then took 5 people hostage. During his 2 day crime spree he also raped a woman while her husband watched .

He surrendered after a half hour-long standoff with a FBI detective. He had held his gun on the agent who had his gun on Moseley during the standoff.

Moseley was also involved in the Attica Prison Riots.

Here

At his most recent parole interview, in 2009, the board cited Mr. Moseley’s “heinous” offense, “total disregard for the life of another human being” and apparent lack of insight into why he killed Ms. Genovese or committed the rape in Buffalo, although he did stress that he sent letters of apology to The New York Times for the Genovese murder and to the Buffalo News for the rape.

The board noted in passing that Mr. Moseley has a good disciplinary record, and made “positive use” of his time in prison by earning a bachelor’s degree in sociology and working as a teacher’s assistant. But the panel, basing its decision on Mr. Moseley’s violent past, concluded that his release would be “incompatible with the welfare and safety of the community.” 

At one parole hearing Moseley said:

“For a victim outside, it’s a one-time or one-hour or one-minute affair,” Moseley said. “But for the person who’s caught, it’s forever.”

He has also said:

“The crime was tragic, but it did serve society, urging it as it did to come to the aid of its members in distress or danger (sic).”

Yes, he tries to place himself into the role of a victim!

He blames his parents and society for his actions.

Riots, beating guards, escape, assault and rape. Also no remorse, no empathy and a reflection of blame.

Why is he getting a hearing and who the Hell thinks this is a “good disciplinary record”???

JoAnne Page, president and chief executive officer of The Fortune Society, a social services and advocacy group that promotes successful re-entry from prison had this to say.

“People change,” Ms. Page said. “If there is anything I know from my 22 years heading Fortune, it is that people who have been menaces to the community have the capacity to become good neighbors and make a positive difference in the world. And the people who committed the most horrific crimes and served decades [in prison] are beyond the age when people tend to recidivate.”

I say that everyone that is released based on this social reform gets a house in Ms. Page’s neighborhood. She seems to want to welcome them to the outside. Let her have them.

At the age of 76, Mr. Moseley is statistically unlikely to re-offend, but the Queens District Attorney’s Office opposes his release and maintains “there is no question that if Winston Moseley is released he will again commit crimes against society and the citizens of New York.”

In a March letter to Mr. Moseley’s parole officer, Executive Assistant District Attorney Charles A. Testagrossa described the inmate as a “callous, vicious, violent man who is a serial rapist, burglar and multiple murder,” and who has no “compassion or sorrow for his victims and is not capable of living a law-abiding life.”

The letter, written before the change in law, references nothing that occurred since 1971, when Mr. Moseley took part in the Attica prison riot.

Full Article Here

@|John Caher can be contacted at jcaher@alm.com.

 

Even if Mosley doesn’t re-offend he is still supposed to be punished.

Prison is not just about reformation, it is about punishment. This man destroyed people and shows no remorse.

Let him rot, I do not care if he is bed ridden, which he isn’t.

Oh, as for his age, a 76 year old serial killer / rapist in good health is a threat. Let’s not discriminate based on age.

 

More information:

In 1977, Moseley wrote a long letter to The Times airing his thoughts on his killings and life in prison. As for the Catherine Genovese murder, he said, “The crime was tragic, but it did serve society, urging it as it did to come to the aid of its members in distress or danger (sic).” The Times, apparently seeing something profound in Moseley’s words, saw fit to publish the entire article in its Op Ed section under the alluring title Today I’m a Man Who Wants to Be An Asset on April 11, 1977. The story spanned 4 columns, replete with graphics and Moseley’s own description of a “different” and “constructive” multiple killer. “The man who killed Kitty Genovese in Queens in 1964 is no more,” Moseley wrote, “Another vastly different individual has emerged, a Winston Moseley intent and determined to do constructive, not destructive things.”

Moseley realized he would become eligible for parole and he began a concentrated effort to gain release from prison. He read books from the prison library, and using taxpayer funds, was able to enroll in a college program. In the late 1970s, he became one of the first inmates in New York State to earn a college degree when he received a B.A. in Sociology from Niagara University. He wrote letters to newspapers and continued his campaign to obtain a parole.

During the period 1984 through 1995, Moseley appeared before the state parole board six times. His appearances were marked by his bizarre, self-serving comments to the panel, and he frequently assumed the role of society’s victim. “For a victim outside, it’s a one-time or one hour or one minute affair, but for the person who’s caught, it’s forever,” he said in 1984. “People do kill people when they mug them sometimes,” he added. At one parole hearing, Moseley claimed he had written a letter to the Genovese family “to apologize for the inconvenience I caused.” The Genovese family strongly denied receiving any such communication nor did they wish for one.

In 1995, at the age of 60, Moseley thought he had found a way out of prison. He appealed to a federal court to give him a new trial because he claimed that his attorney, Sidney Sparrow, had a conflict of interest during his trial. Sparrow had once represented Catherine Genovese on a minor gambling charge and, therefore, Moseley surmised, he could not represent him when he was accused of her murder. This time, however, the Genovese family did attend. All three brothers, Vince, Frank and Bill, who lost both legs in 1967 during the Vietnam War, and a sister, Susan, were there. “It was tough to hear it all again,” said Bill recently, “but it was tougher on Vince who testified.” Sparrow, then 82 years old, also attended the hearing and later said that Moseley was a liar “trying to get out of prison anyway he can.” On November 13, 1995, a federal judge denied Moseley’s request for a new trial saying that Sparrow in 1964 “gave Moseley effective, competent and capable counsel under difficult circumstances.” He was returned to prison once again.

Kitty Killer: I’m Victim Too Says Notoriety Causes Him Hurt

Referring to the Genovese killing, Moseley said: “There were worse murders, and more serious or ones that are just as serious but this case, for some reason, is unprecedented in the annals, in perhaps the last 25 years, in the way it’s been publicized. “It does cause, of course, hurt for me,” he said.

Later, after telling a commissioner he “never intended to kill Miss Genovese,” Moseley said, “What happened then would be called mugging. . . . People do kill people when they mug them sometimes.”

Life Does Not Mean Life Even For Serial Killers

It was a bright day for justice when legislation allowing consecutive sentences for multiple murderers was given royal assent earlier this year.

The prospect of serial killers being eligible for parole after 10 or 25 years, depending on whether it was second-degree or first-degree murder, has grated on Canadians and caused immense anguish for victims’ families.

Fortunately, the federal Conservatives closed that despicable loophole, ending sentence discounts for multiple murderers. The law permits judges to impose consecutive periods of parole ineligibility on people convicted of more than one murder.

So when Joseph Laboucan, 26, was swiftly convicted of first-degree murder Monday — his second murder conviction in four years — I expected Canadian judicial history to be made in Edmonton Court of Queen’s Bench.

In 2007, Laboucan was sentenced to life with no chance of parole for 25 years for the sadistic rape-murder of 13-year-old Nina Courtepatte, who was lured away from West Edmonton Mall on April 3, 2005.

Two days earlier, Laboucan killed prostitute Ellie May Meyer, 33, after picking her up on 118 Avenue with two friends. He had sex with her in a field, beat her to death and cut off part of her left pinkie finger as a trophy.

Laboucan, I assumed, would be the first serial killer in Canada to be hammered with consecutive sentences. He’s got another 21 years to serve for Courtepatte’s murder before he can apply for parole, so adding another 25-year parole ineligibility period would mean he’d spend 46 years in the clink before being considered for release.

Alas, I was far too optimistic. Even though Laboucan’s most recent murder conviction was handed down Monday, the new legislation doesn’t apply to him.

Why? Because the murders took place before the legislation was passed. And because of another legal technicality: although the law received royal assent in March, it’s still not in effect. The law is to come into force on some future date set by the Governor General. It makes you want to rip your hair out.

Not only must this be demoralizing for the families of Courtepatte and Meyer, it will be a shock to the relatives of all the Alberta women who’ve gone missing (and were presumably murdered) over the years.

Even if a serial killer is caught, he will be eligible for parole after 25 years, no matter how many people he killed.

In Laboucan’s case, he committed two murders for the price of one. Clifford Olson, the poster boy of savagery now dying of cancer, committed 11 murders for the price of one — with the right to apply for parole every two years after he’d spent 25 years in jail.

As former Alberta prosecutor Scott Newark points out, it’s as if all the other victims are of no consequence.

“The way our law was designed so many years ago, nobody … ever really thought through all of that,” he says.

It’s too bad Laboucan couldn’t have been hit with a 46-year sentence, adds Newark. He figures federal justice officials were leery of allowing the new law to apply in previous murders, even if the killers aren’t caught until later. “I refer to it as charter angst,” says Newark.

Laboucan isn’t eligible for parole until he serves 25 years of his latest sentence, says Crown prosecutor Doug Taylor.

“With or without the new parole eligibility requirements, the reality of two life sentences is he will likely be in prison the rest of his life.”

Sorry, but that’s little comfort to those who were hoping for harsher justice for serial killers.

Mindelle Jacobs

Edmonton Sun

Mindelle Jacobs has been a columnist with the Edmonton Sun for more than a decade. She writes on a variety of topics, including crime, immigration, health, social issues and current events of the day. 

 

I agree Ms. Jacobs. Excellent article, I hope that the judges listen!

A little information on Laboucan:

 

Laboucan, who is already serving a life sentence for the murder of 13-year-old Nina Courtepatte, pleaded not guilty to the charge of first-degree murder in the death of the sex trade worker back in April 2005. Still, his lawyers did not present any evidence or challenge any Crown exhibits.

Submitted for consideration was testimony from the preliminary hearing, where an eyewitness said she saw Laboucan chasing and repeatedly swinging something at Meyer’s head.

Multiple people also swore the now 26-year-old showed off a severed pinky finger, which the accused told them was a souvenir from one of his victims. DNA later confirmed the body part belonged to the 33-year-old street worker.

In delivering his decision, the judge said he believed the testimony of one youth who said Laboucan got an adrenaline rush from killing Meyer, and wanted to do it again.

RCMP believe just days after Laboucan killed the Edmonton woman and dumped her body in a field, he led Courtepatte to a golf course just outside the city, and committed the second murder.

The Crown says through Courtepatte’s case, they were able to gather key DNA evidence that tied the accused to Meyer’s death.

Whole article here

 

It is such a scary thought that serial killers can be released.

We know that they do not ‘get better’. We can not ‘cure’ them, the only behavior modification that works is death.

How many bodies will court systems allow to pile up before we stop letting serial killers out?

David Owen Brooks Denied Parole

ANGLETON, Texas — Relatives who were told a Houston serial killer may be days away from release expressed relief as his parole was turned down just hours after they addressed Texas Parole Board members, Local 2 Investigates reported Friday.

“I think we got some action, some positive action, from the meeting,” said James Dreymala, whose 13-year-old son, Stanton, was the last victim to die in the 1973 killing spree.

He and other relatives addressed a Texas Board of Pardons and Parole panel member in Angleton Friday, near the prison where David Owen Brooks is serving a life sentence in the killings of at least 29 boys from the Houston Heights.

“I think he’s a human being, and I left it with the fact that any person with any feelings whatsoever would vote no on his parole,” said Dreymala.

His family said that a parole board member told them that parole was likely days away for Brooks, but that attitude changed after Local 2 Investigates reported on the case Thursday night.

Parole Board member Cornith Davis, who was appointed by the governor, shook the families’ hands and told them he had just met with Brooks behind bars Friday as he prepared to make a decision.

Brooks is serving a life term, along with Elmer Wayne Henley, for rounding up boys for serial killer Dean Corrl to torture and kill at a Pasadena home. The crime spree was discovered in 1973 when Henley shot and killed Corrl at that home.

Dreymala’s sister, who was 9 years old when her brother was murdered, said after the meeting that, “I feel like things have changed.”

“I just feel like he’s aware that there’s a lot of power behind us, and that there’s a lot of people that feel the same as we do that, not just victims’ families, but members of society, that don’t want to see him out of prison,” she said.

Facebook page set up by the family to drum up support proudly announced the parole board’s ruling Friday.

Two of the three members of the parole board panel assigned to the case in Angleton cast votes against the parole Friday after the family’s meeting, which formally turned down Brooks’ parole.

 Davis also told the family that he spoke to a relative of Brooks’, who contacted him after the Local 2 Investigates report, and she also urged that parole be denied.

 Brooks will be eligible for parole again in three years. This now makes at least 18 times that his parole has been denied since his 1975 conviction.

James Dreymala said, “I want to see him stay there until he dies, personally.”

 The parole board did turn down the family’s request to have the time between each parole review extended. Instead of being up for parole every three years, they asked the board to extend that to five years between each review.

The board turned down that request.

 Outside the parole board panel meeting in Angleton, city of Houston crime victim’s advocate Andy Kahan said, “There’s no reason for this family and other families to be put through this procedure every few years when it’s within the board’s discretion to give this family more time to heal and go about their lives. This is what you would call a no-brainer case, not to release a serial killer and there’s no reason to every few years to be up here taking the time and resources.”

He said the parole board only extends the time to the state maximum, five years between each parole review, in a fraction of one percent of the eligible murder cases statewide.

 The relatives of Stanton Dreymala said they will meet face to face with parole board members in the same fashion any time that Brooks or Henley come up for parole in the future.

Video and Links

I just can not understand why these families have to keep going through these hearings. Even his own family does not trust him to be out on the streets.

He claims he never killed anyone, but he brought those boys to Corill to be killed. Even if you believe Brooks what he admits to is no different than if he fed the to pigs alive.

From Time Magazine

In all, I guess there were between 25 and 30 boys killed, and they were buried in three different places. I was present and helped bury many of them but not all of them . . . On the first one at Sam Rayburn [Reservoir] I helped bury him, and then the next one we took to Sam Rayburn. When we got there, Dean and Wayne found that the first one had come to the surface and either a foot or a hand was above the ground. When they buried this one the second time, they put some type of rock sheet on top of him to keep him down.

—David Owen Brooks, in his statement to Texas police.

Read more

He minimizes his role every time he speaks.

He guesses there were 25-30? He seems to have so much compassion for the victims doesn’t he?

I agree with Mr. Dreymala, keep him locked up until he dies.

 

David Brooks was born in Beaumont, Texas in 1955. Like Wayne Henley and Dean Corll, he was the product of a broken home. His parents were divorced in the early 1960s when David was only five years old. He spent part of his time in Houston with his father and the rest of the time with his mother in Beaumont.

Wayne Henley (right), David Brooks (left)

Wayne Henley (left), David Brooks (right)

Despite the divorce of his parents, David had a promising beginning as a student, making excellent grades in elementary school. Then in junior high, his grades plummeted. Around this time, he became associated with Dean Corll, who paid him for his sexual favors. Corll had such a grip on the young man that he dropped out of high school shortly after he started so that he could spend all of his free time with Corll.

A sympathetic (IMO) look at David and Wayne from the Crime Library.

Only 3 years to go until his next chance at freedom.

Serial Killer Clifford Olson Dead

VANCOUVER—Relief. Happiness. And a sense that after all these years, finally, there is justice.

Families of serial killer Clifford Olson’s victims are expressing a range of emotions about his imminent death. One thing, however, remains constant for them — their grief never ends.

In a Quebec hospital, cancer is eating away at Olson’s body.

He has finally done the right thing and died!

The country’s pioneer serial killer, whose crimes terrorized the British Columbia’s Lower Mainland, died Friday in Quebec.

Olson’s death was confirmed by the Correctional Service of Canada in a release Friday afternoon. He was 71.

It was learned on Sept. 21 that Olson was apparently dying of cancer with only days or weeks to live, according to families of Olson’s victims.

Maple Ridge resident Ray King, father of slain teen Ray King Jr. said: “It’s over, that’s all I can say about it.

“Time to get on with the business of living,” King said. “For 30 years I haven’t really had a chance to heal some wounds because of him. Now it’s onwards and upwards.”

On his death, it is appalling we are reminded of him rather than those whose lives he stole – Judy Kozma (14), Daryn Johnsrude (16), Raymond King (15), Simon Partington (9), Ada Court (13), Louise Chartrand (17), Christine Weller (12), Terri-Lyn Carson (15), Colleen Daignault (13), Sandra Wolfsteiner (16) and Sigrun Arnd (18).

Article

Makes me hope that there is a Hell.

I hope that his death gives the families some peace.

Court refuses to free child-killer Dutroux’s accomplice

A Belgian court  refused to free Michelle Martin, ex-wife and accomplice of notorious pedophile killer Marc Dutroux, serving life for the kidnap, rape and murder of several girls.

Martin, the 51-year-old mother of three of the jailed killer’s children and a former school teacher, was granted release on parole in May after serving barely half of a 30-year sentence.

But she could not walk free until judicial authorities had approved the terms of her social reinsertion — her work and residence plans.

The decision to free Martin after 15 years in jail triggered an outcry in Belgium earlier this year.

But Thursday, a court in this southern Belgian town ruled her plans for social reinsertion unacceptable, revising the May parole and said it would take a fresh look at her request in May 2012.

Dutroux was jailed for life in June 2004 for the kidnap and rape in the 1990s of six young and teenaged girls, four of whom died.

Hauled before a court the same year, Martin was found guilty of helping Dutroux hold his victims prisoner, and of complicity in the deaths of two eight-year-olds, found starved to death in a locked cellar.

In May, her lawyers said she hoped to transfer to a convent in France after finding God while in jail.

But the French justice ministry refused her transfer to the country.

Martin, a quiet woman who consistently pleaded submissiveness to Dutroux at the trial, admitted to having locked the door to the cellar where he held the girls captive. She was supposed to have fed them when Dutroux was away but told the court she was too afraid.

The Dutroux affair was one of the first in Europe to put pedophilia squarely in the public eye.

News that a woman viewed by many in Belgium as a monster was to be freed outraged much of the country and infuriated victims of the couple’s serial murders, rapes and kidnappings.

Dutroux, an unemployed electrician allegedly surviving on drug-dealing and stolen cars, was arrested in August 1996 after a 14-year-old went missing. She was found alive two days later along with a girl of 12, cowering in the basement of one of his homes.

The case then took a gruesome turn when the bodies of the two eight-year-olds were found buried in the garden of his main residence.

Less than a month later, the bodies of two more girls were found in another property owned by Dutroux.

Public shock turned to fury when it emerged not only that police had missed a string of clues, but that Dutroux had been released from jail in 1992 after serving just three years of a 13-year sentence for the abduction and rape of five girls.

Martin, who like many of his other women met him at an ice-rink, was convicted and jailed for that affair too. She served only two years of her five-year sentence.

I say she did not want to be bothered feeding them. He was in jail and not able to harm her. They were 2 scared and (I am sure) weakened girls.

She should have let them go, if she was any kind of person she would have let those 2 girls go.

Leave her in jail.

Victim of Serial Killer Outraged!

The man who cheated death at the hands of serial killer Dennis Nilsen has condemned a decision to give the murderer cash for a human rights claim.

Dennis Nilsen, who killed at least 17 men in the 1970s and 1980s has been awarded £55,000 to take his case to the European Court of Human Rights to try to publish his autobiography.

Carl David Stotter, 50, of Brighton, said he was enraged to hear Nilsen, who tried to suffocate and drown him, has been given aid – even though the victim has not received a penny in compensation for his ordeal.

Nilsen was refused permission to publish his manuscript by the highest courts in Britain so has taken his case to the European Court in Strasbourg.

That court makes the decision on whether to give him the money to argue his case, but the British government will end up footing the bill.

Mr Stotter said: “Why should he have his human rights when his victims haven’t any?

“It’s not justice.”

“This happened to be 29 years ago and I’ll never forgot it.”

“I feel really angry, but this is not just about me. It is about all the people he killed too.”

“I stopped Nilsen having his book published once before and we won, but no one told me he was going to try again.”

“This is not right. There is less help for victims than killers.”

“I have not received a penny of help from anyone.”

“I was the only one of his victims left to be able to seek compensation and I got nothing.”

**From me: There were others that survived Nilsen.  (Andrew Ho, Douglas Stewart, Paul Nobbs)  See below.

From here.

This is a travesty of justice. There is NO way Nilsen should get money to file this claim. he is prison and that should restrict his ‘rights’.

If he wants to sue he should have to come up with the money himself. Why are we rewarding him in any way?

I would actually read his book but I think and money should be given to the victims and their families.

Victims

  • Murder 1, Stephen Dean Holmes: Nilsen’s first murder took place on 30 December 1978. Nilsen claimed to have met his first victim in a gay bar. Nilsen strangled him with a necktie until he was unconscious and then drowned him in a bucket of water. On 12 January 2006, it was announced that the victim had been identified as Stephen Dean Holmes, who was born on 22 March 1964 and was therefore only 14 at the time; Holmes had been on his way home from a concert. On 9 November 2006, Nilsen finally confessed to the murder of Holmes in a letter sent from his prison cell to the Evening StandardNilsen was not charged for the murder as the Crown Prosecution Service decided that a prosecution would not be in the public interest.
  • Between the first and second murders, Nilsen attempted to murder Andrew Ho, a student from Hong Kong he had met in The Salisbury public house in St. Martin’s Lane. Although afterwards he confessed to the police about the incident no charges were brought and Nilsen was not arrested.
  • Murder 2, Kenneth Ockendon: The second next victim was 23-year-old Canadian student Kenneth Ockendon. Nilsen met the tourist in a pub on 3 December 1979 and escorted him on a tour of Central London, after which they went back to Nilsen’s flat for another drink. Nilsen strangled him with the cord of his headphones whilst Ockendon was listening to a record. Ockendon was one of the few murder victims who was reported as a missing person.
  • Murder 3, Martyn Duffey: Martyn Duffey was a 16-year-old runaway from Birkenhead. On 17 May 1980, he accepted Nilsen’s invitation to come over to his place. Nilsen strangled and subsequently drowned Duffey in the kitchen sink.
  • Murder 4, Billy Sutherland: Billy Sutherland was a 26-year-old father-of-one from Scotland who worked as a prostitute. Sutherland met Nilsen in a pub in August, 1980. Nilsen could not remember how he murdered Sutherland; however, it was later revealed that Sutherland had been strangled by bare hands.
  • Murder 5, Unidentified: The fifth next victim was another man who worked as a prostitute; however, this man was never identified. All that is known is that he was probably from the Philippines orThailand.
  • Murder 6, Unidentified: Nilsen could recall very little about this and the following two victims. All that Nilsen could remember about the sixth man was that he was a young Irish labourer that Nilsen had met in the Cricklewood Arms.
  • Murder 7, Unidentified: Nilsen described the seventh victim as a starving “hippy-type” whom Nilsen had found sleeping in a doorway in Charing Cross.
  • Murder 8, Unidentified: Nilsen could recall little about his eighth victim, except that he kept the man’s body under the floorboards of his flat, until he removed the corpse and cut it into three pieces then put it back again. He burned the corpse one year later.
  • At some point between murders 6 and 8, on 10 November 1980, Nilsen attacked a Scottish barman named Douglas Stewart, whom Nilsen met at the Golden Lion in Dean Street. Stewart woke up while being strangled, and was able to fend off his attacker. Although Stewart called the police almost immediately after the attack, the officers refused to take action; reportedly they considered the incident to be a domestic disagreement.
  • Murder 9, Unidentified: The ninth next victim was a young Scottish man who Nilsen met in the Golden Lion pub in Soho in January, 1981.
  • Murder 10, Unidentified: Another young Scottish man. Nilsen strangled him with a tie and placed the body under the floorboards.
  • Murder 11, Unidentified: Nilsen picked up his eleventh victim in Piccadilly Circus. The man was an English skinhead and had a tattoo around his neck reading “cut here”. The man had boasted to Nilsen about how tough he was and how he liked to fight. However, once he was drunk, he proved no match for Nilsen, who hung the man’s naked torso in his bedroom for a day, before burying the body under the floorboards.
  • Murder 12, Malcom Barlow: The 12th next victim was a 24-year-old named Malcolm Barlow. Nilsen murdered Barlow on 18 September 1981. Nilsen found Barlow in a doorway not far from his own home, took him in, and called an ambulance for him. When Barlow was released the next day, he returned to Nilsen’s home to thank him and was pleased to be invited in for a meal and a few drinks. Nilsen murdered Barlow that night. Barlow was the final victim to be murdered at Melrose Avenue.

In October 1981, Nilsen moved to a new house in Muswell Hill.

  • In November 1981, Nilsen targeted Paul Nobbs, a student, at the Golden Lion in Soho, and invited Nobbs back to his new home. The student awoke the next morning with little recollection of the previous evening’s events, and later went to see his doctor because of some bruising that had appeared on his neck. The doctor revealed that it appeared as if the student had been strangled, and advised him to go to the police. However, Nobbs was concerned about what would happen if his sexual orientation were to be disclosed, and did not go to the police.
  • Following this, Nilsen targeted Carl Stotter *, a drag queen known as Khara Le Fox at The Black Cap, in Camden. After passing out from strangulation, Stotter became conscious while Nilsen was trying to drown him in a bath of cold water. Stotter managed to gasp air four times before losing consciousness. Nilsen’s dog then lapped Stotter’s face and uncovered signs of life.[citation neededNilsen then led Stotter to a railway station, through a forest and the two parted ways. Stotter, due to memory loss from the event and alcohol before, reportedly didn’t realise for several years that he had almost been killed.[citation needed]
  • Murder 13, John Howlett: Howlett had first met Nilsen in a West End pub in December 1981. In March, 1982, John Howlett was the first victim to be murdered in Nilsen’s Muswell Hill home. Howlett was one of the few who was able to fight back; however, Nilsen had taken a dislike to him and was determined that he should die. There was a tremendous struggle, in which at one point Howlett even tried to strangle Nilsen back. Eventually, Nilsen drowned Howlett, holding his head under water for five minutes. Nilsen dismembered Howlett’s body, hid some of Howlett’s body parts around the house and flushed others down the toilet.
  • Murder 14, Graham Allen: Graham Allen was another troubled man; a father, originally from Scotland, whom Nilsen met in Shaftesbury Avenue in September, 1982. Nilsen took Allen to his home and prepared an omelette for him. Nilsen crept up on Allen while he was eating and strangled him to death. After murdering Allen, Nilsen left Allen’s body in the bath, unsure how to dispose of it. After three days, Nilsen dismembered him, like his previous victim. Parts of Allens’ remains were what led to the drains being blocked at the flats where Nilsen lived.
  • Murder 15, Stephen Sinclair: Nilsen’s final victim was a 20-year-old man named Stephen Sinclair who was addicted to drugs and alcohol. Nilsen targeted Sinclair in Oxford Street and bought the youth a hamburger. Nilsen then suggested that they go back to his place. After Sinclair drank alcohol and used heroin at Nilsen’s house, Nilsen strangled Sinclair and dismembered Sinclair’s body. Nilsen recalled that the youth’s wrists were covered in slash marks from where Sinclair had recently tried to kill himself. This murder was on 26 January 1983, less than two weeks before Nilsen was arrested. It was Sinclair’s dismembered remains in the drain outside Nilsen’s home that first alerted the police to Nilsen’s murders.[citation needed]   

Serial killer Clifford Olson Dying of Cancer

VANCOUVER—Relief. Happiness. And a sense that after all these years, finally, there is justice.

Families of serial killer Clifford Olson’s victims are expressing a range of emotions about his imminent death. One thing, however, remains constant for them — their grief never ends.

In a Quebec hospital, cancer is eating away at Olson’s body.

Corrections Canada has informed the family he has just days to live, giving them time to absorb the reality that the monster who forever changed their lives is now about to die.

“It’s hell, but it’s a good hell,” said Dee Johnston, stepmother of 13-year-old Colleen Daignault, who was killed after being stalked by Olson as she planned to take a bus to her grandmother’s house.

“He’s dying of cancer, a cruel, hard death. What goes around comes around. He’s getting his just due,” she told the Toronto Star.

Olson, who once described himself as the “beast of British Columbia,” is serving 11 consecutive life sentences after he was convicted in 1982 of killing eight girls and three boys.

He has been in jail for almost 30 years and accumulated a small fortune in government pensions, according to claims he made to a reporter last year.

When he dies, Olson could be claimed by a family member who will decide how to dispose of his remains. If no family member steps forward, Corrections Canada will turn the body over to the coroner’s office. But one thing Corrections Canada will not allow is for any ceremony or memorial to be erected in Olson’s name.

“No such thing will be allowed,” said Serge Abergel, spokesman for Corrections Canada in Quebec, where Olson has been imprisoned at a maximum security prison.

“If an inmate wants to glorify himself, and falls under the responsibility of corrections, the way things are done will be done with respect to the deceased as well as the victims.”

If Olson has no money and no will his burial will be provided at public expense, including burial clothing and the installation of a grave marker. Abergel said those details would be left with the coroner’s office and no notice would be given of where he is buried.

For privacy reasons, Corrections Canada is not releasing any details about Olson’s medical condition or his current status except for confirmation that he remains under their care.

News of Olson’s decline has brought back public revulsion over a serial killer who once terrorized a nation. The now 71-year-old killer had been a teenage bully and thief, then turned into a police informant, rapist and serial killer. Whether he was eluding police or behind bars, Olson was a sadistic manipulator, always seeking attention.

He made headlines last year when he tried to send a donation to the Conservative Party of Canada and asked for a tax receipt. The party rejected his contribution. For years, he called reporters and wrote letters until Corrections Canada curbed his desperate attempts to draw attention to himself.

He told Toronto Sun columnist Peter Worthington that he has over $100,000 in a Quebec bank and revealed he’s been collecting Old Age Security payments from Revenue Canada of about $1,200 a month.

“What good is money to me? I got no use for it, if you get what I’m getting at. I guess I gotta make a will in case I get a heart attack or something. Don’t want these bastards getting my money,” Olson said to Worthington.

Olson collected $100,000 from the RCMP after he made a deal to direct them to where he had buried the bodies of his victims. That money had been left in a trust for his then-infant son Clifford, Jr. and his estranged wife, Joan.

“This man committed atrocities and the things he did to our children were terrible,” said Johnston. “For anyone who thinks this is closure, this is not.”

In B.C.’s interior, Marie Wolfsteiner said any news of Olson, who killed her daughter Sandra, just “stirs up the families.”

Sandra Wolfsteiner, a pretty 16-year-old brunette living with her sister in Langley, was hunted down by Olson just four days after the killer’s wedding in May 1981 and was killed in the bush in Chilliwack about an hour east of Vancouver.

“He isn’t gone yet,” Marie Wolfsteiner said Wednesday. “I’m not even interested anymore. I just want it to go away.”

Although pig farmer Robert Pickton, charged with killing 20 women and convicted of killing six, is considered Canada’s worst serial killer, Olson’s crimes — targeting vulnerable children — have made him a flashpoint.

Simon Fraser University criminologist Neil Boyd said Olson generated a great deal of fear during the eight months of his killing spree between 1980 and 1981.

“There was the subtext that being an informer for the RCMP that he was somebody who really wasn’t on the radar who ought to have been on the radar,” he said Wednesday. “Clifford Olson has become part of the debate about the reinstatement of the death penalty and a poster boy for the abolition of the faint hope clause.”

Boyd said Olson continued to engage in tactics of manipulation even from behind bars such as requesting parole board hearings and trying to engage with the public through acts such as selling items online.

“You can’t say anything positive about the impact he’s had on the criminal justice system, it’s just negative no matter which way you turn,” said Boyd. “It’s difficult to feel any sense of his loss at his death.”

For Sharon Rosenfeldt, news of Olson’s illness wasn’t a complete surprise. In late August, she was informed by Corrections Canada that the man who killed her 16-year-old son, Daryn Johnsrude, was being transferred out of prison for three days. Families of Olson’s victims surmised that he had serious health issues.

Over the last 30 years, Rosenfeldt, who started a victims’ rights group in Ottawa with Daryn’s stepfather Gary Rosenfeldt, said she often wondered how she would feel if Olson died.

“Do you jump up and down and think yippee, he’s going to be dead soon? He is the man who took my son’s life in a most gruesome manner,” she said.

Over the years, Olson continued to torment her family even from prison — he launched a lawsuit against her for defamation of character, taunted them about Daryn’s last words, tried to sell memorabilia online and even made a dozen videos on how to abduct children. 

I do not understand how the harassment is allowed or tolerated.

This is also another reason I believe these monsters need to get capital punishment, then they can not harm others anymore.

Rosenfeldt said she talked to her son and daughter after learning the news from Corrections Canada on Tuesday.

“We all had a few tears. Our whole life in the last 30 years comes before us when you learn something like this and you realize this has been 30 years,” she said. “It was very emotional because you think of all the people who have lost so much, my daughter and my son, Gary, my parents. The first face I thought of was my son, his little face.”

Clifford Olson’s history of violence

November-July 1980: Clifford Robert Olson, a 41-year-old Coquitlam, B.C. construction worker, terrorizes the Lower Mainland, torturing, sexually assaulting and murdering eight girls and three boys between 9 and 18 years of age. On Christmas Day 1980, the body of Olson’s first victim, Christine Weller, 12, is found strangled and stabbed in Richmond, B.C.

Aug. 12, 1981: Olsen is arrested by the RCMP on Vancouver Island.

Late 1981: Olson reveals locations of victims’ bodies to RCMP after brokering a $100,000 deal for his wife and son — $10,000 a body. He offers the whereabouts of his first victim as a “freebie.”

January 1982: Olson recants his initial not guilty plea, confessing to 11 murders in what was dubbed the “trial of the century.”

Jan. 14, 1982: B.C. Supreme Court hands down 11 simultaneous life sentences.

May 2, 1986: Olson sends a letter to the parents of 16-year-old victim Daryn Johnsrude, detailing their son’s murder. 

IMO: At that point his mail privileges should have been restricted in the very least, canceled  other than with  lawyers and always read before going out of the prison.

Dec. 15, 1989:Imprisoned at Kingston Penitentiary, Olson says God has forgiven him. “I’ve asked for forgiveness, I’ve been forgiven and that’s the end of it.” 

I am happy that God did since no one else seems to have forgiven him!

March 11, 1997:Olson invokes the “faint-hope clause” to request an early parole hearing after serving 15 of his 25-year sentence. A jury takes less than 15 minutes to say no. Victims’ families petition to eliminate the “faint-hope clause,” which gives murderers exhibiting good behavior the opportunity for early parole. The clause is amended in 1997, making Olson the last serial killer to call for early parole.

June 1997: Olson transfers from a Saskatchewan prison to Sainte-Anne-des-Plaines, north of Montreal.

Aug. 21, 2001: A National Parole Board jury needs 17 minutes to agree Olson will stay behind bars.

July 18, 2006: At another parole hearing, Olson claims he struck a deal with the U.S. attorney general regarding 9/11 information and will be extradited. His parole is denied. “Mr. Olson presents a high risk and a psychopathic risk,” the National Parole Board said. “He is a sexual sadist and a narcissist. If released, he will kill again.”

March 2010: Olson, now 70, informs the Toronto Sun he earns over $1,000 a month in old age security benefits, sparking nationwide outrage. The federal government ceases pensions for prisoners locked up longer than two years. Security benefits are eliminated the following year.

Nov. 29, 2010: Olson flunks third parole hearing. He says it will be his last.

Sept. 2011: Victims’ families are notified Olson is dying of cancer in a Quebec hospital.

Here

I hope they can keep him going for a few extra days.

No pain meds, just let him suffer.

 

Did John Wayne Gacy Kill Michael Marino?

For 30 years Sherry Marino has visited the grave site dedicated to her son, Michael Marino.

She is now asking to have the body exhumed and a DNA test ran to make sure that it is Micheal in that grave.

That may not be my son, mom says 30 years after murder

Article

CHICAGO More than 30 years after Sherry Marino buried her 14-year-old son, she is asking for permission to exhume the boy’s remains.

Chicago officials identified Michael Marino as one of 33 victims of serial killer John Wayne Gacy almost four years after his mother reported him missing. But according to papers filed with Cook County Circuit Court Thursday, his mother has long harboured doubts that the body was that of her son.

Lawyers for the mother point to disparities between autopsy findings by the Cook County medical examiner and her son’s dental records and medical history.

The 1979 pathological report indicated that Gacy’s victim had fractured his collarbone and suggested that the child’s molars had started coming in, according to the filing. But X-rays provided by Marino’s dentist months before the boy’s disappearance show that not all of his molars had yet grown in, and the mother does not believe her son ever broke his collarbone, her lawyers said.

Marino wants a DNA test to determine if the boy buried in Queen of Heaven Cemetery in Hillside is her son. She has been visiting the gravesite for more than three decades, according to her lawyers.

Chicago Tribune 

Michael went missing on Oct. 24, 1976, at the age of 14, but wasn’t identified as one of Gacy’s 33 victims until 3 1/2 years later. Over the years, Marino has suspected the body was not really Michael.

On Thursday, her attorney, Robert M. Stephenson, said he will file a petition in Cook County Circuit Court to allow her to have the body exhumed from Queen of Heaven Cemetery in Hillside, the Chicago Sun-Times is reporting.

”She’s always had her doubts,” Stephenson tells CBS 2′s Kristyn Hartman. “She says every time she visits his grave one of the things she wonders is, ‘Is this you?’”

Full article

This article has a video as well.

“It’s going to be expensive to exhume a body, to do DNA testing and compare it. So, there are still a lot of hurdles going forward, but I think that she deserves a definitive answer that science can give her today,” attorney Robert Stephenson told WGN News.

Gacy raped and murdered 33 boys and young men between 1972 and 1978, and reportedly showed no remorse for the crimes. He ultimately convicted and executed in 1994.

I can only imagine her pain.

I do not know what I would do in her position.

Of course you want to know if that is your child in that grave but what if it isn’t? If that is not Michael what happened to him 30 years ago?

This is so sad and no matter the outcome it will not have a happy ending.

I do hope that they allow the testing so that Ms. Marino can have the answer she needs.

Long Island Serial Killer Hunt: Police Release Sketches of Victims

By , JOSH EINIGER and  (@jesshop23)

Police released sketches of two unidentified victims dumped on a Long Island beach by at least one serial killer, including a man dressed as a woman and a woman who may have worked as a prostitute.

The skeletal remains of a female toddler found this past April were linked by DNA to the skeletal remains of a woman found seven miles away, police said.

“It is likely that these two individuals were mother and child,” Suffolk County Police Commissioner Richard Dormer said today.

In addition to the sketches, Dormer released pictures of jewelry and other personal details about the five unidentified sets of remains found along on a stretch of beach off of Ocean County Parkway in Long Island, N.Y.

“We are hopeful that the release of this additional information will aid our investigation in helping identify the unknown victims and their killer or killers,” Dormer said at a press conference.

Do You Know the Long Island Serial Killers Victims?

Since December of last year, New York investigators have found 10 sets of human remains in Suffolk and Nassau County. Five of those remains have been identified as prostitutes, and the rest remain a mystery.

One of the sketches released was of a slightly built male victim who police said was wearing female clothing at the time of his death. Police said the Asian man was between 17 and 23 years old and approximately 5- feet-6. The man was missing both his top and bottom molars and one of his top front teeth, police said.

The death could have occurred between five and 10 years ago, police said.

The toddler is non-Caucasian and was wearing hoop earrings and a rope necklace, Dormer said. She was between 16 and 32 months old. The child’s adult relative had two bracelets on when she was murdered, one bracelet with Xs and Os with stones resembling diamonds and a snake chain, police said.

The two could have disappeared between one and five years ago, police said.

Sketch of Jane Doe 6/Suffolk County Police

Another victim identified as Jane Doe 6 was described as having been between the ages of 18 and 35 and approximately 5-feet-2. Her head, hands and right foot were recovered on April 4. Dormer said that DNA taken from those remains were linked to a torso found in Manorville, N.Y., in November 2000. A sketch showed a Caucasian woman with hair to her shoulders.

“To narrow the focus this woman would have been last seen alive in the late summer or fall in 2000…Consider that this woman may have been working as a prostitute in New York City during that time…This woman may have had a tattoo or other identifiable characteristic on her right ankle,” Dormer said.

A forensic artist is working on a third sketch of a woman whose legs were found in April. DNA from her remains has been linked to remains discovered on Fire Island in Nassau County, N.Y., in 1996.

Suffolk County police, who are being assisted by Nassau County cops as well as state police and the FBI, have been tight-lipped about the investigation. Law enforcement sources told ABC News that all of the victims appear to have been slain elsewhere, dismembered and transported to the beaches for disposal.

Four of the identified bodies were found wrapped in burlap in December 2010 and were prostitutes. They have been identified as Maureen Brainard-Barnes, Melissa Barthelemy, Megan Waterman and Amber Lynn Costello. All of the women advertised their services on Craigslist.

The most recent set of remains to be identified belonged to prostitute Jessica Taylor. In April, authorities recovered Taylor’s skull and hands. The rest of her body had been found 30 miles away in Manorville, N.Y., in 2003, the same area where Jane Doe 6’s torso was found.

Dormer made an appeal for help from New York City’s escorts.

“We also want to reach out to the people in the escort business to come forward with information. We are not interested in their occupation and feel that their information will be very valuable to this investigation,” Dormer said.

The Suffolk Police have not identified any suspects in the killing and will not say how many killers they believe may have used the beach as a dumping ground.

In December of last year, police first began scouring the pristine Gilgo Beach in the search for missing prostitute Shannan Gilbert. Her remains have not been recovered and the investigation into her disappearance is ongoing, police said.

Long Island Serial Killings: New Details Released Watch Video
Bodies Found in Long Island Work of 3 Killers Watch Video
Long Island Serial Killer: New Witness? Watch Video
The page has quite a few photos and videos.
The possible connection to the Atlantic City Killer seems to have died out although with 10 bodies and at least 2 killers in NY who knows what will develop.

So Many Signs Missed With Budding Serial Killer

The girl did not know the tall boy with jet-black hair.

He might not have known her, either. Centennial High School is a big place.

But he wasn’t interested in a formal introduction.

As the 16-year-old girl disappeared into a school bathroom, the boy followed. And when she tried to exit her stall, he pounced.

She screamed as the boy’s hands clamped around her throat. He forced her back into the stall and jammed her against the toilet.

It’s unclear how long the assault in 2009 lasted. It ended after another student heard screams and followed the sound into the bathroom.

That student was the person who later identified the boy to Clark County School District police: Javier Righetti, then 17, and now charged with murder in the brutal rape and killing of 15-year-old Alyssa Otremba over Labor Day weekend.

Because Righetti was a minor, the juvenile court sealed the case. The Review-Journal learned about the Centennial incident through multiple sources with knowledge of the offense.

Experts now say the attack may have been the first documented incident in a pattern of behavior pointing to a budding serial killer.

Righetti, now 19, was expelled from Centennial, in the northwest valley, after the 2009 assault. He was charged with felony kidnapping, coercion and battery, according to sources. He was sentenced to one year at the Caliente Youth Center, a secure facility.

What troubled investigators — at the time of the Centennial assault and again after Otremba’s death — was that Righetti was not charged with a sex offense in the bathroom attack.

Because of that, he probably wasn’t treated as a potential sex offender while incarcerated, said Alexis Kennedy, a criminal justice professor at UNLV and an expert in youth sex offenses.

“If he wasn’t charged with anything sexually related, they probably wouldn’t have done a sex offender assessment,” Kennedy said. “It wouldn’t have been on their radar.”

Rehabilitation is the primary goal of juvenile justice, Kennedy said. But how do you fix a sex offender if you don’t know he’s a sex offender?

Katherine Ramsland, a criminal justice professor at DeSales University in Pennsylvania and an expert on serial killers, said courts are hesitant to label juveniles.

Although authorities may have suspected Righetti was a potential sex offender, labeling him as one in 2009 would have been premature without additional evidence.

“No matter what their opinions were, if you overreach and label a kid as a sex offender, that could be detrimental for life,” she said. “But this kid has shown, he was on his way.”

I understand not classifying the kid publicly but we, as a society, have to warn officials.  Since he did not get ‘help’ (although I wonder if there is help for serial killers even as teens) the local police and school system should have been told.

Actually I can not understand why he was not forced into some kind of therapy in the juvenile facility. That should be mandatory.

The similarities between the 2009 assault and Otremba’s killing were striking.

In both cases, Righetti was accused of approaching a girl whom he did not know in a busy area. In the first case, it was at school; in the second, a well-lit, heavily traveled street.

In both cases, the motivation was sexual, sources said. But in the Centennial incident, there was no physical proof of a sexual assault.

“He just didn’t have time to do anything to her. This guy was a sick puppy,” said one source, who requested anonymity.

Otremba was not as fortunate.

The Arbor View High School freshman was raped before being stabbed more than 40 times, Las Vegas police said. Her body was then doused with gasoline and set ablaze.

Righetti confessed to police, according to his arrest report. In the interview with detectives, Righetti also admitted to another rape and robbery. Detectives are investigating those claims as Righetti awaits his fate in the Clark County jail.

One law enforcement source called Righetti a “monster” who was already a serial rapist with a growing compulsion to kill.

Ramsland agreed, assessing that the suspect fits the profile of a budding serial killer.

“He’s got the anger issues, he uses weapons, he has brutalized people, he takes risk, and he’s starting young,” she said. “Those are all pretty big red flags.”

Why was not addressed while he was locked up? Why was he allowed to go free?

In both incidents, authorities said Righetti attacked girls despite a high probability of being caught.

That’s an impulse act, as opposed to a calculated plan, Ramsland said.

“The opportunity was there, and he had the compulsion to act,” she said. “The driving need usually comes from a rich fantasy life where he (a serial killer) does things like that. When he sees an opportunity to actually do it, he may act.

“Only after the feelings recede does he realize the risk he took,” she said.

Kennedy said it’s natural to cast blame toward authorities after a heinous event, but predicting behavior in teenagers is an imprecise science.

“Human behavior is so hard to predict,” she said. “This was the worst possible outcome of the worst possible scenario.”

Because juvenile records are sealed, the public doesn’t know exactly how Righetti’s case was handled.

Kennedy said the “choking” aspect of the Centennial incident should have concerned authorities. That’s a sign of escalating violent tendencies, she said.

Could Otremba’s death have been prevented? No one can know, Kennedy said. Even in the best-case scenario, with all the right treatment and therapy, Kennedy said sex offenders may relapse.

“Everyone in corrections at juvenile justice is saying, ‘I hope I haven’t had this person,’ ” Kennedy said.

“Every system that had contact with him is second-guessing themselves, looking at what they might have done differently.”

They should be second guessing themselves. This kid was a time bomb and no one seems to even have tried to diffuse him.

%d bloggers like this: